Contemplate impermanence

General discussion, particularly exploring the Dharma in the modern world.
[N.B. This is the forum that was called ‘Exploring Buddhism’. The new name simply describes it better.]
Post Reply
mariel.hespanhol
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2019 12:22 pm

Contemplate impermanence

Post by mariel.hespanhol » Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:59 am

Do you have any instructions, tips and suggestions for beginners on how to contemplate impermanence?
Thanks a lot :anjali:
Que todos os seres possam se beneficiar _/\_

muni
Posts: 4761
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 am

Re: Contemplate impermanence

Post by muni » Tue Aug 13, 2019 7:24 am

Hi Mariel,I find to think on the moment of death helpful to use this life for purification. And thereby having the intention of acting for all, because that is important for transforming-purifying mind. If we keep holding on the experience of permanent self and other permanent selves - things, we find no peace now and not at that very moment. It is therefore important to put Dharma in our daily life and not to keep it in words. These are not going to safe "us" and we cannot take any of them with us in a pc or bag.

When action is with this thought on death, practice to purify our view is becoming a strong wish. This purification cannot without the care for all and all.



:anjali:
Which human beings are “fortunate and connected?” They are the ones who generate love, compassion, and devotion, as well as the commitment to remain steadfast on the path until all beings are liberated. Venerable Khenpo Rinpoches.

Not to identify oneself with something, or to associate things with the 'me,' and to see that the idea that there is a 'me,' which is distinct from things, is a delusion. H H Dalai Lama.

muni
Posts: 4761
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 am

Re: Contemplate impermanence

Post by muni » Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:08 am

It is possible to awaken by contemplating impermanence. I forgot who said this. :smile:
Impermanence isn’t just defined by decay, rot, and disintegration. Impermanence allows us to access the diamonds and see more than just the mud. Our neurotic, limited, confused sense of self is not anchored inside us. Our patterns of self-denigration, grasping, anger, and anguish are also impermanent. Because of impermanence, we can change – if we want to. But we do not have all the time in the world. When the recognition of impermanence shakes us into accepting the certain demise of our body, then we really aspire to make the most of our life. The truth of impermanence becomes the wind at our backs urging us not to squander the precious opportunity that we have right now. Mingyur Rinpoche
Every phenomenon we can think of is compounded, and therefore subject to impermanence. Certain aspects of impermanence, like the changing of the weather, we can accept easily, but there are equally obvious things that we don’t accept.
For instance, our body is visibly impermanent and getting older every day, and yet this is something we don’t want to accept. Certain popular magazines that cater to youth and beauty exploit this attitude. In terms of view, meditation and action, their readers might have a view — thinking in terms of not aging or escaping the aging process somehow. They contemplate this view of permanence, and their consequent action is to go to fitness centers and undergo plastic surgery and all sorts of other hassles.
Enlightened beings would think that this is ridiculous and based on a wrong view. Regarding these different aspects of impermanence, getting old and dying, the changing of the weather, etc., Buddhists have a single statement, namely this first seal: phenomena are impermanent because they are compounded. Anything that is assembled will, sooner or later, come apart.
When we say “compounded,” that includes the dimensions of space and time. Time is compounded and therefore impermanent: without the past and future, there is no such thing as the present. If the present moment were permanent, there would be no future, since the present would always be there. Every act you do — let’s say, plant a flower or sing a song — has a beginning, a middle and an end. If, in the singing of a song, the beginning, middle or end were missing, there would be no such thing as singing a song, would there? That means that singing a song is something compounded.
“So what?” we ask. “Why should we bother about that? What’s the big deal? It has a beginning, middle, and end—so what?” It’s not that Buddhists are really worried about beginnings, middles or ends; that’s not the problem. The problem is that when there is composition and impermanence, as there is with temporal and material things, there is uncertainty and pain.
Impermanence is not necessarily bad news; it depends on the way you understand it.
Some people think that Buddhists are pessimistic, always talking about death, impermanence and aging. But that is not necessarily true. Impermanence is a relief! I don’t have a BMW today and it is thanks to the impermanence of that fact that I might have one tomorrow. Without impermanence, I am stuck with the non-possession of a BMW, and I can never have one. I might feel severely depressed today and, thanks to impermanence, I might feel great tomorrow. Impermanence is not necessarily bad news; it depends on the way you understand it. Even if today your BMW gets scratched by a vandal, or your best friend lets you down, if you have a view of impermanence, you won’t be so worried.
Delusion arises when we don’t acknowledge that all compounded things are impermanent. But when we realize this truth, deep down and not just intellectually, that’s what we call liberation: release from this one-pointed, narrow-minded belief in permanence. Everything, whether you like it or not—even the path, the precious Buddhist path—is compounded. It has a beginning, it has a middle and it has an end.
When you understand that “all compounded things are impermanent,” you are prepared to accept the experience of loss. Since everything is impermanent, this is to be expected. Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche.
Which human beings are “fortunate and connected?” They are the ones who generate love, compassion, and devotion, as well as the commitment to remain steadfast on the path until all beings are liberated. Venerable Khenpo Rinpoches.

Not to identify oneself with something, or to associate things with the 'me,' and to see that the idea that there is a 'me,' which is distinct from things, is a delusion. H H Dalai Lama.

muni
Posts: 4761
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 am

Re: Contemplate impermanence

Post by muni » Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:18 am

Which human beings are “fortunate and connected?” They are the ones who generate love, compassion, and devotion, as well as the commitment to remain steadfast on the path until all beings are liberated. Venerable Khenpo Rinpoches.

Not to identify oneself with something, or to associate things with the 'me,' and to see that the idea that there is a 'me,' which is distinct from things, is a delusion. H H Dalai Lama.

mariel.hespanhol
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2019 12:22 pm

Re: Contemplate impermanence

Post by mariel.hespanhol » Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:33 pm

Thanks a lot muni!
muni wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:18 am
Loved it
Que todos os seres possam se beneficiar _/\_

Post Reply

Return to “Dharma in Everyday Life”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], shaunc and 73 guests