H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

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H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Fri Apr 24, 2015 11:25 am

Tashi delek DW members,
His Holiness the 33rd Menri Abbot..jpg
His Holiness the 33rd Menri Abbot..jpg (311.33 KiB) Viewed 2141 times
Our His Holiness is the head of all Bonpo's worldwide.

He is like a father to us and his kindness and Wisdom are great.
Did met him in 2008 for 5 days at tea time from 09.00 - 12.00 o'clock at his house (Menri Monastery).
Did learn a lot of these 5 days visits from our His Holiness. :bow: :bow: :bow:

May our His Holiness live long.


Mutsug Marro
KY
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Tue Dec 19, 2017 3:25 pm

IN ADDITION:

Tashi delek ,


Here follows the biography of H.H. the late Menri Trizin Rinpoche Lungtok tenpa Nyima

By:

Khri gYung drung. 2017. A Short Biography of His Holiness the 33rd Abbot of Menri, Lungtok Tenpei Nyima. gYung drung bon gyi dra rgya las khungs.

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H.H. The 33 Menri Trizin Lungtok Tenpa Nyima Rinpoche.jpg
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Lungtok Tenpai Nyima was born in 1929 in a town called Kyangtsang (skyang tshang) in Sharkhok (shar khog) in the southeast of Amdo, in present-day Sichuan.


Sharkhok is also called Zungchu (zung chu), and now the region is known as Songpan. His father was called Yang Gyelo (yang rgyal lo) of the family Jongdong Tsang (ljong sdong tshang). His mother was named Barongza Tsomo (ba rong za mtsho mo), which means Tsomo, the Lady of Barong. The 5th of 6 children, he was given the name Lama Tar (bla ma thar).

At the age of 7 he started to learn how to read and write Tibetan under Jatsang Sungtar (bya tshang srungs thar). At the age of 13 he began to learn liturgies of the Bon tradition and under Tenpa Lhundrub (bstan pa lhun grub) he started to take up medical practice of the Tibetan medicine following in the footsteps of his eldest brother Yang Tsultrim (yang tshul khrims).

At the age of 17 Sherab Tenpai Gyeltsen (shes rab bstan pa'i rgyal mtshan), a lama of Kyangtsang Monastery (skyang tshang dgon) also known as Phuntsok Dargye Ling (phun tshogs dar rgyas gling), granted him the vows of novice monk and gave him the name Sherab Namdak (shes rab rnam dag). At the same time, he began to study philosophy and logic of the Bon tradition under Horwa Drungrampa Tendzin Lodro Gyatso (hor ba drung rams pa bstan 'dzin blo gros rgya mtsho, 1889-1975), the chief teacher at Kyangtsang Monastery.

At the age of 25 he took the geshe (dge bshes) degree. After completing his studies he was sent by his master Tendzin Lodro Gyatso to the palace of the king of Trokyab (khro skyabs), one of the eighteen principalities of Gyalrong (rgyal rong). This involved a long and perilous journey on foot.

His task was to have a complete Bon Canon consisting of more than 200 volumes printed from woodblocks which were kept at the Trokyab Palace. With funds sent by his master, he had the Bon Canon printed and transported back to Kyangtsang Monastery, again on foot.

In 1955 at the age of 27 , with the encouragement of his master, Lungtok Tenpai Nyima traveled to Lhasa. The following year he went to see Alak Nangsel Namkha Gyeltsen (a lags snang gsal nam mkha’ rgyal mtshan) in Dza Adrak (rdza a drag) not far from Nakchukha (nag chu kha). In the same year he also went to Drepung ('bras spungs), the famous Geluk monastery near Lhasa to study Buddhist philosophy and logic which naturally helped him to widen his attitude towards other Tibetan religious traditions.

While studying in Drepung he began to teach a young layman of a Lhasa noble family astrology. It was expected that other young laymen students would join his layman student. However, in March, 1959 his monastic life at Drepung was suddenly interrupted by the Tibetan uprising against the Chinese occupation of Tibet.

He fled to India via Nepal where as a refugee he worked with Samten Karmay (mkhar rme'u bsam gtan rgyal mtshan, b. 1936) to publish Bon texts, some of which he himself had brought on his back from Tibet. In search of more texts to be reprinted he also traveled from India to Dolpo in northwestern Nepal.

It was in Dolpo that he met Professor David L. Snellgrove (1920-2016) who was doing his fieldwork there and was looking for Tibetans who might be interested to work with him at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Snellgrove had obtained grants for inviting Tibetan refugees from India from the "Special funds for Tibetan Studies" that the Rockefeller Foundation allocated to its Humanities program for the year 1960. David Snellgrove brought Lungtok Tenpai Nyima along with his colleagues Lobpon Tendzin Namdak (slob dpon bstan 'dzin rnam dag) and Samten Karmay to London in 1961.

In London Lungtok Tenpai Nyima began to take an interest in the life of Christian monks. He was attracted to the self-sufficient way in which Christian monks led lives in their monasteries, and appears to have been the first Tibetan monk to make a detailed observation of how Christian monks lived. He made visits to Quarr Abbey on the Isle of Wight, a Catholic Benedictine Monastery, and particularly admired the food products all made by the monks themselves on the monastery grounds. In addition he visited other Christian monasteries in Britain as well as those on Mount Athos in Greece. To crown his knowledge of Christian monastic life he sought and obtained a private audience with Pope Paul VI in the Vatican in 1964 and received a silver medal as a gift. He was the first Tibetan monk to meet with a pope.

His close contacts with the Christian monasteries in the West had a notable influence over how he later ran his own Bon monastery at Dolanji, Himachal Pradesh, India. In the same year, he returned to India to participate in establishing a school for the Tibetan refugee children in Moussorie with the help of the Ockenden Venture, a British charity organization, but soon was invited to work with Professor Per Kvaerne (b. 1945) in the University of Oslo. While he was in Oslo in 1968, unbeknown to him, he was elected by lot as the abbot of Menri Monastery (sman ri dgon) by the Bon refugee community in India. Thus he became the Thirty-third Menri Trizin, the holder of the Menri throne. He received the name Lungtok Tenpai Nyima as his enthronement name.

Menri Monastery was completely destroyed during the Chinese Cultural Revolution of the late 1960s. Beginning in 1970 Lungtok Tenpai Nyima built a new Menri Monastery in Dolanji, and within a decade later it had become a flourishing monastery with over 300 monk students coming from central Tibet, Amdo, Kham, Ngari, Dolpo, Mongolia and the exiled community in India.

The Menri Trizin took to the role of administrator rather than educator. Monks follow the 8 year course of philosophy and logic and the studies of what is known as the 5 sciences (rig gnas lnga) as well as courses in Tantric and Dzogchen teachings that finally lead to obtaining the geshe degree, officially recognized by the Tibetan exile administration. As of 2017, 122 monks have graduated with geshe degrees from the monastery.

Lungtok Tenpai Nyima encouraged about 30 of these graduates to go back to Tibet when there was an opening at the beginning of 1980s, to help rebuild monasteries that were destroyed during the Cultural Revolution. This had a far reaching beneficial influence in restoring what was lost not just for the Bon people but for the Tibetan people as a whole. To enhance this initiative he undertook visits to Tibet in 1994 and 1996 to guide his students there on their mission.

Coexistence between Buddhist and Bön communities in Tibet has never been easy, with many instances of intolerance and discrimination over the centuries. In a decree issued in 1679, the 5th Dalai Lama Ngawang Lobzang Gyatso (ngag dbang blo bzang rgya mtsho 1617-1682) expressly recognized the Bön tradition as an official religion of Tibet, encouraging tolerance and understanding.

In 1988 Lungtok Tenpai Nyima invited the 14th Dalai Lama (ta la'i bla ma 14 bstan 'dzin rgya mtsho, b. 1935) to Menri Monastery in Dolanji, and worked with him to promote goodwill between the two communities. The Dalai Lama visited again in 2007 for the opening of a new monastic library that housed both the Buddhist and Bon Canons as well as the manuscripts and printed texts collected and brought back from Tibet by Lungtok Tenpai Nyima on his visits to Tibet.

In 2001 Menri Trizin founded the nunnery Ratna Menling (rat+na sman gling) near Menri Monastery in India. Over 50 nuns currently follow a similar course in their studies to that of the monks.

In 2016, Lungtok Tenpai Nyima began to have health problems and made trips to the United States to have medical treatments. Despite a brief improvement, on September 14, 2017, the 33rd Menri Trizin, Lungtok Tenpai Nyima died at Menri Monastery surrounded by his close disciples. He was eighty nine years old.

In a tribute, in Tibetan, the ´14th Dalai Lama wrote: "In this moment when it is the most weak and helpless period in Tibet's political and religious history, we shared our joy and sorrow together as refugees. He generally carried on his activities that beneficially served the Tibetan political and religious interests. A few months ago when I was in Delhi he came to see me and confided to me his thoughts concerning many important public and private matters. I truly feel sad as his words now come back to my mind."
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sat Dec 23, 2017 6:57 pm

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:07 pm

The best meditation is no meditation

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:23 pm

The best meditation is no meditation

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:40 pm

The best meditation is no meditation

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sun Mar 18, 2018 3:39 pm

Tashi delek,

So i knew, the late H.H. the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche.
He is an open minded, humble and respectful Yungdrung Sempa, who is easy going .
For all Bönpos he was like a father and we miss him , no doubt about it.
'

:bow: :bow: :bow:
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sun Mar 18, 2018 4:00 pm

Posted just by H.E.the Menri Ponlob Rinpoche


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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:46 am

Tashi delek,

A great Yungdrung Sempa / Bodhisattva, with His daily work based on endless Compassion and Wisdom. :namaste:

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:48 am

Tashi delek,

This video was recorded during the first teaching session of an all-day live webcast with H.H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima Rinpoche, spiritual leader of the Bon Buddhist tradition of Tibet; and Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, spiritual director of Ligmincha Institute. These teachings took place on July 6, 2013, at Ligmincha Institute's Serenity Ridge retreat center in central Virginia during its annual Summer Retreat.

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:40 am

IN ADDITION:

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by Lhasa » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:12 pm

Kalden,
There is a Russian sangha that was formed and aligned with H.H. 33rd. They had a website and on it are recordings of H.H. chanting various things. I have lost the link. Are you familiar with that sangha?

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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:21 pm

Lhasa wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:12 pm
Kalden,
There is a Russian sangha that was formed and aligned with H.H. 33rd. They had a website and on it are recordings of H.H. chanting various things. I have lost the link. Are you familiar with that sangha?
Tashi delek L,

Yes i guess i know some Russian Bönpos, Arta lama is one of them.
He is doing a great job in spreading the Bön in Russia.

http://artalama.narod.ru/ssilki.ru.html
http://savetibet.ru/2007/07/08/chod_in_moscow.html

=================

http://bon-po.ru/?fbclid=IwAR2dr1n5FfZJ ... TJoG9Iq5_E

That is all i know. I know from Ata Lama Rinpoche many of his followers all devoted Bönpos.

Hope this helps

Best wishes :namaste:
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:07 am

Tashi delek,

What a historic picture , when our His Holiness the Gyalwa 33rd menri Trizin Rinpoche visited Za Mongyal Yungdrung Ling in Tibet.
He was welcome by Mongyal Lhasa Rinpoche and village peoples and army too. Even the Chinese military is giving here a helping hand.

By: Jean Huang
.
H.H. the  33rd Gyalwa Menri TRizin Rinpoche  & Mongyal Lhasa Rinpoche - 00.jpg
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sun Oct 14, 2018 11:57 am

Tashi delek,

Prayer of Menri monks for H.H. the Gyalwa 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

====================

༄༅། ཨེ་མ་ཧོ།
རབ་འབྱམས་ཕྱོགས་བཅུའི་རྒྱལ་བ་སྲས་བཅས་ཀྱི།
མཁྱེན་བརྩེ་ཡེ་ཤེས་ངོ་བོ་གཅིག་བསྡུས་པ།
ཟབ་རྒྱས་གཤེན་བསྟན་སྤེལ་བའི་འཕྲིན་ལས་ཅན།
ལུང་རྟོགས་བསྟན་པའི་ཉི་མར་གསོལ་བ་འདེབས།


E MA HO !
RAB JAM CHOG CHÜ GYAL WA SE CHE KYI
KHYEN TSE YE SHE NGO WO CHIG DÜ PA
ZAB GYE SHEN TEN PEL WAI TRIN LE CHEN
LUNG TOK TEN PAI NYI MAR SOL WA DEB


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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:29 pm

Tashi delek,

༧རྗེ་བླ་མའི་ཡབ་གཞིས་ཨ་མདོ་ཤར་ཁོག་སྐྱང་ཚང་དགོན་ནས་གསར་བཞེངས་གནང་བའི་༧སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞིང་གཤེགས་དམ་པ་ཁྲི་འཛིན་༣༣པའི་སྐུ་གདུང་མཐོང་གྲོལ་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་དེ་རིང་སྐྱང་ཚང་དགོན་དུ་གདན་ཞུས་གནང་བ་་་
.🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻.

The enlightened Buddha, His Holiness the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche's newly Golden Statue at Kyangtsang Monastery, Amdo Sharkhok ( His Holiness's own village monastery) 8th February 2018.

.
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:30 am

Tashi delek,

The Silver statue of His Holiness 33rd Menri Trizin Lungtok Tenpi Nyima Rinpoche :namaste:


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H.H. the Gyalwa Menri Trizin Rinpoche Lungtok Tenpa Nyima Rinpoche - 051a.jpg
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:39 am

Tashi delek,


Samten G. Karmay wrote the following last year, 16. Oktober 2017. He posted this great and hitherto unknown foto. :namaste:

=================

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LTN and SK - 00.jpg
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A Tribute to Menri Trizin Rinpoche Lungtok Tenpai Nyima 1929 – 2017 :namaste:



Lungtok Tenpai Nyima (LTN), aka Sangye Tenzin Jongdong 1929-2017 was the 33rd Abbot of Menri Monastery, Dolanji, Himachal Pradesh, India

LTN received his education at the Bonpo Monastery of Kyangtsang in Sharkhog, southeast of Amdo, a region now known as Songpan in Sichuan, China. We were in the same class and followed all the courses of traditional learning given by my grand-uncle Hortsun Tenzin Lodro Gyatsho (1889-1975), the chief teacher at Kyangtsang Monastery and we both obtained the Geshe degree at the same time in 1954.

From an early age he was interested in medicine and soon he became a physician of the Tibetan medicine, a practice he maintained throughout his life wherever he went and whenever it was possible. After completing his studies he was sent by our master Tenzin Lodro Gyatsho to have a complete Bönpo Canon consisting of more than 200 volumes printed from its woodblocks in Gyalrong.

This involved a long and perilous journey on foot from Sharkhog. Nevertheless, he successfully carried out the task. This was his first major undertake. In 1955 with the encouragement of our master we traveled together to Lhasa to study Buddhist philosophy and logic at Drepung, a Gelug monastery near Lhasa which naturally helped him to widen his attitude towards other Tibetan religious traditions.

While studying in Drepung he also began to teach a young layman of a Lhasa noble family the Tibetan zodiacal astrology. It was expected that other young laymen students would join his layman student. However, in March, 1959 our monastic life was suddenly interrupted by the Tibetan uprising against the Chinese occupation of Tibet. We fled to India where as refugees we began to publish Bönpo texts some of which LTN had himself brought on his back from Tibet.

In search of more texts to be reprinted he also traveled to Dolpo where he met Professor David L. Snellgrove who was doing his fieldwork there and was looking for Tibetans who might be interested to work with him in London University as he had obtained grants for inviting Tibetans from India. The grants were from the “Special funds for Tibetan Studies” allocated to the Rockfeller Foundation’s programme in the Humanities of the year 1960. David Snellgrove therefore invited LTN with Lopon Tenzin Namdak and myself to go to London in 1961

Once in England besides his work, LTN began to take an interest in the life of Christian monks especially the idea of self-sufficient way of living in Christian monasteries. He was the first Tibetan monk to make detailed observation of how the Christian monks lead their lives.
For this he made visits to Quarr Abbey on the Isle of White, a Catholic Benedictine Monastery and particularly envied the food products all made by the monks themselves with the monastery’s own allotment. In addition he visited other Christian monasteries in Britain as well as those on Mount Athos in Greece.
To crown his knowledge of Christian monastic life he sought and obtained a private audience of Pope Paul VI in the Vatican in 1964 receiving a silver medal as a gift. His close contacts with the Christian monasteries had a notable influence over how he later ran his own Bonpo monastery in India. In the same year, he returned to India to participate in establishing a school for the Tibetan refugees with the help of the Ockenden Venture, a British charity organization, but soon was invited to work with our colleague Professor Per Kvaerne in the University of Oslo. While he was in Oslo in 1968 unbeknown to him, he was elected the abbot of Menri Monastery by the Bonpo refugee community in India. Thus he became the 33rd Menri Trizin, the holder of the Menri throne.

Menri Monastery was founded in 1405 by Nyamme Sherab Gyaltsen (1356-1415) in Tsang, Tibet, but it was completely destroyed during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Nevertheless, LTN did not take lightly the daunting task to build a new Menri Monastery in exile at Dolanji in 1970 which a decade later became a flourishing monastery with over 300 monk students coming from Central Tibet, Amdo, Kham, Ngari, Dolpo in Nepal, Mongolia and the exiled community in India. The monk students follow the eight year course of philosophy and the studies of what is known as the five sciences as well as courses in Tantric and Dzogchen teachings that finally lead to obtaining the Geshe degree.

LTN encouraged many of his students after the completion their studies to go back to Tibet when it was open at the beginning of 1980s to help rebuild monasteries that were destroyed during the Cultural Revolution. In my view, this had a far reaching beneficial influence in restoring what was lost not just for the Bonpo people but for the Tibetan people as a whole. To enhance this initiative he undertook visits to Tibet to guide his students who were there on mission.

In a decree issued in 1679 the 5th Dalai Lama Ngawang Lobzang Gyatsho (1617-1682) expressly recognized the Bon tradition as an official religion of Tibet that brought goodwill and understanding between the Tibetan Buddhists and Bonpo, but after his death this understanding began to wane. The 14th Dalai Lama therefore took the opportunity to renew the understanding when LTN invited him to pay a visit to the Menri Monastery in Dolanji in 1988. Again in 2007 he made another visit to the monastery. This time it was for opening the new library of the monastery that houses the Bonpo manuscripts collected and brought back from Tibet by LTN when he made visits to Tibet.

LTN did not forget the Bonpo nuns. In 2001 He founded the nunnery Ratna Menling near the Menri Monastery that has over 50 nuns who follow a similar course in their studies to that of the monks.
All his life, he worked tirelessly for the Bonpo tradition and the Tibetan people and was supported by many devoted donors and friends from the West and the Tibetan community.

He was one of the closest and staunch friends of HH the 14th Dalai Lama, both working for tolerance and understanding between the different Tibetan religious traditions. In his tribute written in Tibetan when LTN passed away the 14th Dalai Lama states: “In this moment when it is the most weak and helpless period in Tibet’s political and religious history, we shared our happiness and suffering together as refugees. He generally carried on his activities that beneficially served the Tibetan political and religious interests. A few months ago when I was in Delhi he came to see me and confided to me his thoughts concerning many important public and private matters. I truly feel sad as his words now come back to my mind.”

Personally he was my closest friend since childhood and his passing away, although expected, is a tremendous loss for me. Life took us on different paths but we remain close and respectful of each other's engagements.

Samten G. Karmay
Director of Research Emeritus
National Centre of Scientific Research (CNRS), Paris
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sat Apr 20, 2019 10:45 am

IN ADDITION:

His Holiness the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche and H.E. the Bön Yongdzin Rinpoche are karmic seen very deep connected.
Both contributed with immense effort to the maintenance and spreading of the pre Tibetan Buddhist Bön Culture in the western world of today.
For that mission, all Bönpos worldwide bow deeply with many respect. :namaste:
:bow: :bow: :bow:
=======================
.
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Re: H. H. Lungtok Tenpai Nyima, the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:16 pm

Tashi delek,

His Holiness the 33rd Menri Trizin Lungtok Tenpai Nyima Rinpoche, spiritual head of the Bön Buddhist tradition, joins Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche in this live Webcast recorded June 26, 2011.

His Holiness offered his prayers and blessings for healing.

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