Bön Vinaya

Discussion of the fifth religious tradition of Tibet.
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kalden yungdrung
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Bön Vinaya

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:23 am

Tashi delek,

Bönpos as well Chöspas have their Vinaya Tradition.

Some argue that Buddhists received Vinaya rules from Bönpos.

However, Lha lung Dpal gyi rdo rje, the Buddhist monk who had assassinated Glang dar ma in the mid-ninth century, heard that there
was a surviving Vinaya tradition in Amdo: that of the Bönpos. A group of young Buddhists travelled there, received ordination from a Bonpo
monk called Dgongs pa rab gsal, and went back to Central Tibet where they founded their own Buddhist monasteries. This means that the smad
’dul (eastern Vinaya) lineage is shared by the Buddhists and the Bonpos, and not just that: according to the Bönpos, the Tibetan Buddhists
received their monastic lineage from the Bönpos, not the other way round.

The Bön Vinaya can have 4, 6 or 8 chapters, depending on the version.

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THE VINAYA OF THE BÖN TRADITION
BY
ULRIKE ROESLER




1. Bā ga yangs ma kun ’byung dbyings dag rgyud (vol. 3, pp. 2–206, 104 fols, cat. 179.1). Also known as ’Dul ba kun ’byung rtsa ba’i rgyud.
This text is by far the longest of the Vinaya section and has more than 40 sub-chapters. It contains a section on the four root vows (rtsa ba’i
sdom pa, see above). It also deals with other forms of behaviour a monk should refrain from, such as drinking alcohol, eating meat and garlic,
wearing ornaments, attending amusements, using luxurious and high seats and beds, and eating after mid-day.

These rules of behaviour are familiar from the Buddhist monastic codes. In its later chapters, however, this text continues in a different vein by moving on to topics of what we could call “psychology”. A monk must give up the five mental poisons (delusion, passion, aversion, avarice, and pride) as well as harmful speech, thinking badly of others, malicious thoughts, sloth, being dominated by hopes and fears, and similar harmful attitudes. The text also contains chapters on other sets of vows, such as the temporary dge bsnyen ordination for only one day.

2. ’Dul ba kun ’byung dbyings dag rgyud (added in smaller script:
Phal chen sdom byed dam pa’i rgyud) (vol. 3, pp. 207–73, 33 fols, cat. 179.2). This text has 21 sub-chapters. After an introductory section, it
gives explanations of the Mahāyāna attitude in general, including topics such as generating bodhicitta, understanding the concept of relative
truth (kun rdzob), and following the path towards liberation.

3.’Dul ba dus chen dus brtsan sdom byed rgyud (vol. 3, pp. 275–348,
37 fols, cat. 179.3). This section has 19 sub-chapters. It contains explanations of the pratītyasamutpāda, the effects of good and bad karma, and the benefits of morality or ethics (tshul khrims). Interestingly, it also includes sections on the circumambulation of holy objects, generating good karma through freeing animals (srog bton) and accumulating merit through donations. Like the first text, it recommends avoiding harmful attitudes such as the five mental poisons and performing the ten wholesome actions. In spite of being a Vinaya text, it addresses general
considerations of ethics that apply equally to monastics and laity.

4.’Dul ba don gyi kun brjod (vol. 3, pp. 349–73, 12 fols; cat. 179.8
This text lists the different types of vows (pho khrims, mo khrims, gtsang ma gtsug phud, dge bsnyen, bsnyan gnas) and contains the ritual
of confession (gso sbyong), including the words that are spoken on this occasion. In the edition of the canon in 192 volumes (the one catalogued
in Martin, Kværne and Nagano 2003) it is placed at the end of the Vinaya section (see Martin, Kværne and Nagano 2003: 202–203).

5. ’Dul ba yongs rdzogs rnam dag sdom byed kyi rgyud (vol. 3, pp. 375–464, 45 fols, cat. 179.4). This text has 37 sub-chapters.
It deals with the ordination ceremony and the way the ordained person should behave and addresses a number of topics that correspond to the Buddhist Vinayavastu. It contains sections on monastic dress (sham thabs, stod gos sil bu, bla gos, smad gos, pad zhwa, pad khug) and the personal
items a monk may possess (washing flask (khrus bum), staff (hos ru), begging bowl (gzhi skur), razor, needle, rosary and tools for making
fire). While there are many similarities with the Buddhist regulations, there are also some details that are specific to the Bön tradition, such as
the Bönpo “lotus hat” (pad zhwa), and Bon terminology such as hos ru for the staff and gzhi skur for the bowl. Like the previous texts, it then
moves on to topics of general ethics. In particular it addresses avoiding harm to other sentient beings, not splitting the community, and giving
up harmful attitudes such as greed and deceit.

6. ’Dul ba so sor thar pa’i bye brag rgyud (vol. 3, pp. 465–540, 38 fols, cat. 179.5). This text has about 20 sub-chapters.
From a Buddhist point of view, the title seems to suggest that it deals with the prātimokṣa (Tib. so sor thar pa). However, it does not correspond to the Buddhist Prātimokṣasūtra.18 Only a third of the text deals with taking the vows and the confession of offences; the remaining part deals with the need for the renunciate to give up home, country, and friends and follow the path to liberation, creating favourable conditions for the practice of the Great Vehicle.

7. (3–541) ’Dul ba’i nyams gso lam sdom rgyud / Gcig nyams gcig len las sdom rgyud (vol. 3, pp. 541–604, 32 fols, cat. 179.6).
This text has 33 chapters and contains instructions for the confession and atonement of transgressions. It is broadly subdivided into the topics of sbyong ba (“cleansing”) and gso ba (“mending, re-establishing” the vows).

8. Supplement: ’Dul ba spyi ltos ’gog pa sdom byed rgyud (vol. 3, pp. 605–76. 36 fols, cat. 179.7). This text has 18 sub-chapters.
According to the chapter headings, it deals with topics related to knowledge of the world in general, such as ignorance, cause and effect, the phenomenal world, and time. The sets of rules for monastics that are embedded in this voluminous collection (in particular in the first and the fifth text) are similar to the Buddhist monastic rules, although not entirely identical; this point will require a much more detailed comparison than has been carried out for the present article. However, even without having undertaken a full comparison of the individual rules, it is striking how much additional material is contained in the ’Dul ba rgyud drug. In particular, much consideration is given to the mental factors that underlie moral
transgressions, such as ignorance, mental afflictions, the “five mental poisons”, and other misguided and harmful attitudes. Moreover, the collection repeatedly addresses general ethics and karma as well as elements that resonate with the Mahāyāna (see in particular the second and the third text). Overall, it does not resemble a monastic law code in the strict sense. It has integrated topics that within Buddhist literature would rather be found in commentarial literature on the Vinaya, in abhidharma texts, or in works related to Mahāyāna ethics.

The collection is therefore much more than just another version of the Mūlasarvāstivāda Vinaya; it is an independent creation with an original approach to monastic vows and transgressions and with its own specific terminology and structure.
The best meditation is no meditation

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jake
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Re: Bön Vinaya

Post by jake » Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:21 pm

kalden yungdrung wrote:
Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:23 am
Tashi delek,

Bönpos as well Chöspas have their Vinaya Tradition.

Some argue that Buddhists received Vinaya rules from Bönpos.
How do you support this claim, Kalden Yungdrung? The very article you cite in the post above clearly states:
Roesler 2015 wrote: There is no indication that Tibet had any form of monasticism before the arrival of Buddhism. The first Buddhist monastery, Bsam yas, was founded in the late eighth century with royal support, and the Indian scholar Śāntarakṣita became its first abbot. The only monastic code that was ever translated into Tibetan was the Mūlasarvāstivāda Vinaya, and since then all Tibetan Buddhists adhere to this tradition.
So, if Bon pre-dates Buddhism in Tibet then how did the Buddhists receive vinaya rules from Bonpos????

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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Bön Vinaya

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sat Dec 07, 2019 1:05 pm

jake wrote:
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:21 pm
kalden yungdrung wrote:
Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:23 am
Tashi delek,

Bönpos as well Chöspas have their Vinaya Tradition.

Some argue that Buddhists received Vinaya rules from Bönpos.
How do you support this claim, Kalden Yungdrung? The very article you cite in the post above clearly states:
Roesler 2015 wrote: There is no indication that Tibet had any form of monasticism before the arrival of Buddhism. The first Buddhist monastery, Bsam yas, was founded in the late eighth century with royal support, and the Indian scholar Śāntarakṣita became its first abbot. The only monastic code that was ever translated into Tibetan was the Mūlasarvāstivāda Vinaya, and since then all Tibetan Buddhists adhere to this tradition.
So, if Bon pre-dates Buddhism in Tibet then how did the Buddhists receive vinaya rules from Bonpos????
Well according the murderer of Lang Dharma, he stated that this was the case, Bön Vinaya rules which were accepted as valid by Buddhists.
Imo, later on came the Mūlasarvāstivāda Vinaya and this was then the standard for the Chöspas.
Anyway this article / topic shows that Bön also has some Vinaya rules and a mix is possible , like with all pre Buddhist topics.

See also here:
Some parts of the Bön Vinaya , i marked in Blue color
viewtopic.php?f=78&t=32463
The best meditation is no meditation

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