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idea to translate the word dharma

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:36 am
by Supramundane
i think i came up with a good translation of the word "dharma" which is polysemantic and thus defies any literal translation.

but how about:

fundament


i think that captures many of the nuances of the word.

PS Fundament-bums doesn't sound as kick-ass as 'dharma-bums' but no translation is perfect i guess.

Re: idea to translate the word dharma

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:43 am
by Wayfarer
Unfortunately, if you check the etymology of 'fundament' in English, I think you will find it also refers to the gluteus maximus, otherwise known as the buttock. :emb: It kind of stands to reason, but detracts from its overall usefulness as a word.

Re: idea to translate the word dharma

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 6:58 am
by Crazywisdom
Held

Re: idea to translate the word dharma

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 2:43 am
by Supramundane
Wayfarer wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:43 am
Unfortunately, if you check the etymology of 'fundament' in English, I think you will find it also refers to the gluteus maximus, otherwise known as the buttock. :emb: It kind of stands to reason, but detracts from its overall usefulness as a word.
well then Wayfarer, it doesn't stand but sits to reason i guess lol.

perhaps the translator can put in square brackets [NOT THE BUTTOCKS].

"...From this we can learn the Dharma [NOT THE BUTTOCKS]..."

but this hardly seems feasible.

hmmm.... i will have to go back to the drawing board then on this one.

Re: idea to translate the word dharma

Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2018 3:07 am
by Wayfarer
I don’t know if ‘dharma’ really needs translation. It’s one of those words which I think has become part of globalised English to the point where the average educated person would have at least some idea of what it stands for.

Re: idea to translate the word dharma

Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 7:42 pm
by kalden yungdrung
Supramundane wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:36 am
i think i came up with a good translation of the word "dharma" which is polysemantic and thus defies any literal translation.

but how about:

fundament


i think that captures many of the nuances of the word.

PS Fundament-bums doesn't sound as kick-ass as 'dharma-bums' but no translation is perfect i guess.
Tashi delek,

Dharma / Dhamma can have different meanings.

- It can be related to the teachings of the Buddha Shakyamuni ( To hold / keep them)
- It can be related to "phenomena" like objects.

The Classical Sanskrit noun dharma (धर्म) or the Prakrit Dhaṃma (𑀥𑀁𑀫) are a derivation from the root dhṛ, which means "to hold, maintain, keep",[note 3] and takes a meaning of "what is established or firm", and hence "law". It is derived from an older Vedic Sanskrit n-stem dharman-, with a literal meaning of "bearer, supporter", in a religious sense conceived as an aspect of Rta.[16

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dharma