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Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:09 am
by anjali
At the beginning of the article, Colliding neutron stars apply kiss of death to theories of gravity,
Theoreticians claim to love data. Data is the thing that allows them to test their theories and prove that they are right. Unfortunately for them, the data often doesn't support the theory. In those cases, the data has just stabbed your labor of love right in the heart, and you are expected to say "thank you, sir. May I have another?"

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 10:20 pm
by PuerAzaelis
Image

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:55 am
by Wayfarer
Apparently the universe is held together by something unknown. As matter is the only kind of thing we think is real, then we think it must be matter. But we can’t actually see it, so it must be dark. Hence. Dark Matter.

The gaps are getting bigger. :alien: :woohoo: :shrug:

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:44 pm
by DNS
doesntmatter3.jpg
doesntmatter3.jpg (69.48 KiB) Viewed 1809 times
I revised the comic posted by PureAzaelis to put a more Zen spin to it.

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 2:23 pm
by PuerAzaelis
A meme is born.

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:08 am
by Jesse
Wayfarer wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:55 am
Apparently the universe is held together by something unknown. As matter is the only kind of thing we think is real, then we think it must be matter. But we can’t actually see it, so it must be dark. Hence. Dark Matter.

The gaps are getting bigger. :alien: :woohoo: :shrug:
I believe the universe is proposed to be held together by fields. As in the unified field theory. There are also higgs boson particles, which are what makes matter 'solid'. It gives particles mass, is responsible for gravity, etc.

I believe anti-matter is simply the opposite of normal matter, for example, an antiproton would have its charges totally in reverse. Actually it seems more like a total negation of a normal proton. Which is really weird.

Image

My guess is that Dark Matter is other Dimensions (which would make sense as dark energy+matter composes something like 95% of the universe). Normal matter is only 5% of the universe, which is kind of crazy when you think of how much of it there is.

I also think dark energy may be something like a nervous system of the universe. They have shown Dark Energy Forms the basis of all Matter structures in the universe, at least on a large scale. For example, if you look at a map of the dark energy in the universe, it exists in a web-like pattern mixed with dark matter, and normal matter.



I love thinking about this stuff :P

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:33 am
by Lucas Oliveira
Jesse wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:08 am

I love thinking about this stuff :P
science speaking that the universe is an illusion, a simulation ...

it's a trip

Is our universe FAKE? Physicists claim we could all be the playthings of an advanced civilisation

Physicists say there is a possibility that our world is merely a simulation
They claim there may be evidence of this if only we know where to look
For instance, some of the laws of physics may not quite add up, they say

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... ation.html

https://www.space.com/30124-is-our-universe-a-fake.html


:namaste:

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 3:03 am
by anjali
Lucas Oliveira wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:33 am
Is our universe FAKE? Physicists claim we could all be the playthings of an advanced civilisation
Aliens playing marbles with galaxies. End of Men in Black 3. :)

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:06 am
by Lucas Oliveira
anjali wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 3:03 am
Lucas Oliveira wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:33 am
Is our universe FAKE? Physicists claim we could all be the playthings of an advanced civilisation
Aliens playing marbles with galaxies. End of Men in Black 3. :)
I remember that scene :thumbsup: ... I think it was in the first movie

:namaste:

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 5:02 am
by Wayfarer
Albert A. Michelson, in 1894, wrote: It seems probable that most of the grand underlying principles [of physics] have been firmly established … An eminent physicist remarked that the future truths of physical science are to be looked for in the sixth place of decimals.
Well - that didn't work out.

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 6:17 am
by Kim O'Hara
Wayfarer wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 5:02 am
Albert A. Michelson, in 1894, wrote: It seems probable that most of the grand underlying principles [of physics] have been firmly established … An eminent physicist remarked that the future truths of physical science are to be looked for in the sixth place of decimals.
Well - that didn't work out.
Indeed. That quote is up there with, "No-one will ever need a computer with more than xxx of memory."

:popcorn:
Kim

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 6:26 am
by Kim O'Hara
Lucas Oliveira wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:06 am
anjali wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 3:03 am
Lucas Oliveira wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:33 am
Is our universe FAKE? Physicists claim we could all be the playthings of an advanced civilisation
Aliens playing marbles with galaxies. End of Men in Black 3. :)
I remember that scene :thumbsup: ... I think it was in the first movie

:namaste:
Umm ... YouTube reckons the end of the third movie. :thinking:
But a good scene, anyway.
A critical plot point within one of the movies was that our own solar system (or galaxy - I can't remember) was a bauble on the collar of a silly little pooch belonging to a resident alien.

:coffee:
Kim

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 6:42 am
by Jesse
Lucas Oliveira wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:33 am
Jesse wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:08 am

I love thinking about this stuff :P
science speaking that the universe is an illusion, a simulation ...

it's a trip

Is our universe FAKE? Physicists claim we could all be the playthings of an advanced civilisation

Physicists say there is a possibility that our world is merely a simulation
They claim there may be evidence of this if only we know where to look
For instance, some of the laws of physics may not quite add up, they say

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... ation.html

https://www.space.com/30124-is-our-universe-a-fake.html


:namaste:


This theory has been around for a while, and if true it would be likely that our overlords themselves are also living in a simulation, and their overlords as well, and so on for infinity. As each time a universe is simulated, the civilization would advance to the point where they could create a simulation of the universe. Which would keep happening in an infinite loop.

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 8:59 am
by mikenz66
Kim O'Hara wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 6:17 am
Wayfarer wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 5:02 am
Albert A. Michelson, in 1894, wrote: It seems probable that most of the grand underlying principles [of physics] have been firmly established … An eminent physicist remarked that the future truths of physical science are to be looked for in the sixth place of decimals.
Well - that didn't work out.
Indeed. That quote is up there with, "No-one will ever need a computer with more than xxx of memory."

:popcorn:
Kim
And Ernest Rutherford's famous quote about nuclear reactions:
We might in these processes obtain very much more energy than the proton supplied, but on the average we could not expect to obtain energy in this way. It was a very poor and inefficient way of producing energy, and anyone who looked for a source of power in the transformation of the atoms was talking moonshine. But the subject was scientifically interesting because it gave insight into the atoms
:heart:
Mike

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:49 pm
by Queequeg
Jesse wrote:
Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:08 am
I love thinking about this stuff :P
So do physicists. And they get paid for it!

If I had known how tripped out physics is, I would have worked harder in high school. My in-laws are physicists - one a theorist, the other an experimentalist. The theorist likes to say he sits in his office with a pad, a pencil, and stares at the wall until an idea comes to him. The experimentalist has a lab with insanely powerful "microscopes" that she and her assistants built themselves, and I swear, they look about as jerry-rigged as some of my grade school science experiments.

If I knew then... I need a mulligan on life. lol

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:53 pm
by Queequeg
I watched that video Lucas posted and started thinking about the expanding universe...

time and space is, for lack of a better word, malleable, right? Is it possible the universe is not actually expanding, and rather, we're all shrinking?

This might not be the right place to look for an answer to that.

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:39 pm
by anjali
Queequeg wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:53 pm
time and space is, for lack of a better word, malleable, right? Is it possible the universe is not actually expanding, and rather, we're all shrinking?
I don't think that works, since current thinking is the universe started from the Big Bang. Speaking of which, Calvin and Hobbes discuss the Big Bang. :smile:

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:53 pm
by Queequeg
anjali wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:39 pm
Queequeg wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:53 pm
time and space is, for lack of a better word, malleable, right? Is it possible the universe is not actually expanding, and rather, we're all shrinking?
I don't think that works, since current thinking is the universe started from the Big Bang. Speaking of which, Calvin and Hobbes discuss the Big Bang. :smile:
But, the big bang wasn't an explosion, in the way a bomb explodes. It didn't expand outward from a single point, but rather, the entire universe *popped* into being in an instant. The red shift we observe indicates the distance between the source and the observer is increasing, but who's to say the actual distance is not expanding, but rather everything is simultaneously shrinking...

When we look inside an atom, its mostly space. Could it be that everything is actually condensing very rapidly, but since we're all condensing at the same rate we don't notice this, except when we look at the constant of light and notice a red shift...

I'm going to go ask my experts... If I thought this, I'm sure someone else has already at least floated the idea...

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:54 pm
by Kim O'Hara
Queequeg wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:53 pm
I watched that video Lucas posted and started thinking about the expanding universe...

time and space is, for lack of a better word, malleable, right? Is it possible the universe is not actually expanding, and rather, we're all shrinking?

This might not be the right place to look for an answer to that.
It's a good idea but not a new one.
Decades ago (I'm not saying how many :spy: ) I read a SF short story with exactly this premise. As I remember it, the people in it only started noticing something weird was happening when the lowest-frequency radio waves started disappearing from the radio astronomers' spectrum. By the time they worked out that the reason was that the universe was already smaller than a couple of wavelengths across, mid-frequencies were dropping out as the universe continued to shrink ...
:toilet:

:coffee:
Kim

Re: Nerd humor in gravitational physics

Posted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:01 am
by Queequeg
Kim O'Hara wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:54 pm
Queequeg wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:53 pm
I watched that video Lucas posted and started thinking about the expanding universe...

time and space is, for lack of a better word, malleable, right? Is it possible the universe is not actually expanding, and rather, we're all shrinking?

This might not be the right place to look for an answer to that.
It's a good idea but not a new one.
Decades ago (I'm not saying how many :spy: ) I read a SF short story with exactly this premise. As I remember it, the people in it only started noticing something weird was happening when the lowest-frequency radio waves started disappearing from the radio astronomers' spectrum. By the time they worked out that the reason was that the universe was already smaller than a couple of wavelengths across, mid-frequencies were dropping out as the universe continued to shrink ...
:toilet:

:coffee:
Kim
Oh, right... the lower frequencies... there still might be some weird space-time glitch... but my theory is getting less elegant.

LOL amateur physics! :woohoo: