Bodhisattva Doctrine in Buddhist Sanskrit Literature

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Nicholas Weeks
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Bodhisattva Doctrine in Buddhist Sanskrit Literature

Post by Nicholas Weeks » Tue Apr 29, 2014 10:25 pm

By Har Dayal and first published in 1932. I never read it and wonder if it is too dated to be of value now or has he any unusual insights that are little emphasized today?
It is not a matter of achieving Bodhi or attaining Buddhahood. Rather, you yourself become aware that your own mind has always been fully enlightened.

Li Tungxuan

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pueraeternus
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Re: Bodhisattva Doctrine in Buddhist Sanskrit Literature

Post by pueraeternus » Tue Apr 29, 2014 11:15 pm

Will wrote:By Har Dayal and first published in 1932. I never read it and wonder if it is too dated to be of value now or has he any unusual insights that are little emphasized today?
It is wonderful. Indeed a bit outdated, but a good scholarly work overall. Note that Har Dayal is/was a Hindu nationalist, so you might catch a whiff of that in his writing (when he talks about Buddhist doctrines), but it's does not distract from the overall soundness of the work.
If you believe certain words, you believe their hidden arguments. When you believe something is right or wrong, true of false, you believe the assumptions in the words which express the arguments. Such assumptions are often full of holes, but remain most precious to the convinced.

- The Open-Ended Proof from The Panoplia Prophetica

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Nicholas Weeks
Posts: 2857
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am
Location: California

Re: Bodhisattva Doctrine in Buddhist Sanskrit Literature

Post by Nicholas Weeks » Tue Apr 29, 2014 11:55 pm

pueraeternus wrote:
Will wrote:By Har Dayal and first published in 1932. I never read it and wonder if it is too dated to be of value now or has he any unusual insights that are little emphasized today?
It is wonderful. Indeed a bit outdated, but a good scholarly work overall. Note that Har Dayal is/was a Hindu nationalist, so you might catch a whiff of that in his writing (when he talks about Buddhist doctrines), but it's does not distract from the overall soundness of the work.
Thank you - I will add it to my wish list.
It is not a matter of achieving Bodhi or attaining Buddhahood. Rather, you yourself become aware that your own mind has always been fully enlightened.

Li Tungxuan

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