Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

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PauloJ
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Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by PauloJ » Fri Jan 25, 2019 8:09 pm

Have you ever thought of making a post just with quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence, emptiness, etc.?

For example:
All are ephemeral, and all momentary.
There is no eternal self; the enlightened know it to be void in itself.
As causes and conditions meet and part, things come into existence and
dissolve.
Having realized this well, you will know that all are void from the
beginning
-- Shan-tao
http://www.chinabuddhismencyclopedia.co ... n_on_Amida

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明安 Myoan
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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by 明安 Myoan » Sat Jan 26, 2019 1:39 am

Check out Ippen. "No Abode" is beautiful. I'm reading it again.

Chinese and Vietnamese Pure Land will have lots of what you're after. For Honen, I'll take a look in the coming days.
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that, to guide me I simply say Namu-Amida-Butsu. -- Ippen

The Fundamental Vow [of Amitabha Buddha] is just for such people as woodcutters and grassgatherers, vegetable pickers, drawers of water and the like, illiterate folk who merely recite the Buddha's name wholeheartedly, confident that as a result of saying "Namu Amida Butsu" they will be born into the western land. -- Master Hōnen

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PauloJ
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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by PauloJ » Sat Jan 26, 2019 7:13 pm

I found that too:
"Only contemplation of emptiness and saying the nembutsu-practices I took up from time to time-have stood me in good stead for the world beyond."

-- Plain Words on the Pure Land Way, 10.

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Vasana
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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by Vasana » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:11 am

Mönlam Tharchin wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 1:39 am
Check out Ippen. "No Abode" is beautiful. I'm reading it again.

Chinese and Vietnamese Pure Land will have lots of what you're after. For Honen, I'll take a look in the coming days.
Any follow up? Having a background in TB but a newfound interest in Amitabha and his pureland I'm inclined towards pureland teachings framed around emptiness, compassion and the 3 kayas although thanks to the writings of Ju Mipham Rinpoche, I recognize the validity of 'other power' for those whom it suits. I've only touched on Honen and small part of Shinran's work so far. Honen resonates.

I Would also be curious to see any commentaries talking about the empty nature of the Buddha, the pureland, and the emptiness of Bodhisattvas, inhabitants and so on as per the diamond and Prajnaparamita sutras for example.
  • “Subhåti, what do you think, does a Bodhisattva
    adorn Buddhalands?
    “No, World Honored One. And why? The adorn-
    ment of Buddhalands is no adornment, therefore it is
    called adornment.
https://purelanders.com/2011/12/17/does ... pure-land/

I suppose from a meditative stand point, schools that blend Pureland and Chan may be closer?
'When alone, watch your mind. When with others, watch your speech'- Old Kadampa saying.

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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by Admin_PC » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:11 am

Mod note: Split off some off-topic posts into a new thread. Frankly, Chandrakirti is not considered a Pure Land master and so quoting him isn't appropriate in this thread.

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明安 Myoan
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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by 明安 Myoan » Mon Feb 11, 2019 5:52 am

Vasana wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:11 am
Any follow up? Having a background in TB but a newfound interest in Amitabha and his pureland I'm inclined towards pureland teachings framed around emptiness, compassion and the 3 kayas although thanks to the writings of Ju Mipham Rinpoche, I recognize the validity of 'other power' for those whom it suits. I've only touched on Honen and small part of Shinran's work so far. Honen resonates.
I thought about it more and decided Honen doesn't teach emptiness per se, leaving it to Shandao's classification of the Holy Gate.
Honen and Shandao attained Nembutsu-Samadhi through their exclusive practice, and had visions of the Pure Land and Amitabha.
(I think it's a form of Thinking-of-Buddhas Samadhi from the Shurangama Sutra)
But directly discussing emptiness, I realize I haven't seen that from Honen, except in the Holy Gate/Pure Land Gate framework.

The teachings on the Mind, emptiness, Self-Nature Amitabha are more apparent in Chinese and Vietnamese works.

* Yinguang - Pure Land Zen, Zen Pure Land (one of my favorites, reminiscent of Honen)
* Pure Land Buddhism - Dialogues with Ancient Masters
* Thich Thien Tam - Buddhism of Wisdom and Faith
* Pure Land Teachings of Master Chuhung

Berzin talks of visualization as a form of superimposition. He says something like practice leads to a pure perception being "superimposed" onto ordinary impure perception, which reveals the voidness of both.
Especially the section "The Benefits of Superimposing Appearances" was reminiscent of continuous nembutsu.
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that, to guide me I simply say Namu-Amida-Butsu. -- Ippen

The Fundamental Vow [of Amitabha Buddha] is just for such people as woodcutters and grassgatherers, vegetable pickers, drawers of water and the like, illiterate folk who merely recite the Buddha's name wholeheartedly, confident that as a result of saying "Namu Amida Butsu" they will be born into the western land. -- Master Hōnen

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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by Sentient Light » Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:16 pm

Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika, maybe...?
:buddha1: Nam mô A di đà Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Quan Thế Âm Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Đại Thế Chi Bồ Tát :bow:

:buddha1: Nam mô Bổn sư Thích ca mâu ni Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Di lặc Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Địa tạng vương Bồ tát :bow:

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Vasana
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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by Vasana » Wed Feb 13, 2019 6:45 pm

Thanks for the info & resources, Mönlam Tharchin.
Sentient Light wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:16 pm
Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika, maybe...?
http://web.mit.edu/stclair/www/easypath.html

Nagarjuna on the the Path of Easy Practice

"[Question]: You say that the Stage of Non-retrogression is extremely difficult to enter, requiring a long period of practice, and ask me if there is a path of easy practice whereby you can attain this stage quickly.

[Answer]: These are words of a cowardly and contemptible man, and not those of a brave man with a strong aspiration. If, however, you insist on hearing from me about this method of practice, I will explain it to you."

"There are innumerable modes of entry into the Buddha's teaching. Just as there are in the world difficult and easy paths - travelling on foot by land is full of hardship and travelling in a boat by sea is pleasant - so it is among the paths of the bodhisattvas.

Some exert themselves diligently, while others quickly enter Non-retrogression by the easy practice based on faith."

Amida Buddha's Primal Vow is as follows:

'If anyone contemplates me, recites my name, and takes refuge in me, he will instantly enter the Stage of Assurance and subsequently attain the highest perfect Bodhi.'

For this reason, you should always be mindful of Him."
'When alone, watch your mind. When with others, watch your speech'- Old Kadampa saying.

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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by Admin_PC » Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:48 pm

Some quotes from the Pratyutpanna Samadhi Sutra:
The Buddha said, “Bodhisattvas in this land can see Amitābha Buddha by thinking intently only of Him. When they see Him, they can ask, ‘What Dharma should I uphold in order to be reborn in Your land?’ Amitābha Buddha will reply, ‘Those who wish to be reborn in my land should think of my name. If they can continue without rest, they will succeed in being reborn here.’”

The Buddha said, “Because of intent thinking, one will be reborn there. One should always think of Amitābha Buddha’s body with the thirty-two physical marks and the eighty excellent characteristics, unequaled in its majesty, radiating vast bright light to illuminate everywhere. He teaches, in the assembly of Bodhisattvas and bhikṣus, that dharmas [in true reality] are empty and, therefore, indestructible. Why? Because indestructible are all dharmas, such as form, pain, itch, thinking, perception, birth, death, consciousness, spirit, earth, water, fire, wind, the human world, and the heaven world, including Great Brahma Heaven. By thinking of a Buddha, one attains the Samādhi of Emptiness.”
“As an analogy, a handsome young man dressed in fine clothes wants to see his own face. He can see his reflection by looking into a hand mirror, pure oil, clear water, or a crystal. Does his reflection come from the outside into the mirror, oil, water, or crystal?”

Bhadrapāla replied, “No, it does not. God of Gods, it is because of the clarity of the mirror, oil, water, or crystal, that the man can see his reflection. His reflection comes from neither the inside [of the medium] nor the outside.”

The Buddha said, “Very good, Bhadrapāla. Because the medium is clear, the reflection is clear. Likewise, if one wishes to see a Buddha, one with a pure mind will be able to see. When one sees Him, one can ask questions, and He will give a reply. Having heard the teachings, one will be exultant and think: ‘Where does this Buddha come from and where am I going? As I think of this Buddha, He comes from nowhere and I am going nowhere. As I think of the desire realm, the form realm, and the formless realm, these three realms are formed by my mind. I can see what I think of. The mind forms a Buddha for itself to see; the mind is the Buddha mind. As my mind forms a Buddha, my mind is the Buddha; my mind is the Tathāgata; my mind is my body.’

“Although the mind sees a Buddha, the mind neither knows itself nor sees itself. The mind with perceptions is saṁsāra; the mind without perceptions is nirvāṇa. Dharmas as perceived are not something pleasurable. They are empty thoughts, nothing real. This is what Bodhisattvas see as they abide in this samādhi.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse:

The mind does not know itself; the mind does not see itself.
The mind that fabricates perceptions is false; the mind without perceptions is nirvāṇa.
Dharmas are not firm, only founded upon thinking.
Those who see emptiness with this understanding are free from perceptions and expectations.

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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by SonamTashi » Thu Feb 14, 2019 9:35 am

Admin_PC wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:48 pm
Some quotes from the Pratyutpanna Samadhi Sutra:
The Buddha said, “Bodhisattvas in this land can see Amitābha Buddha by thinking intently only of Him. When they see Him, they can ask, ‘What Dharma should I uphold in order to be reborn in Your land?’ Amitābha Buddha will reply, ‘Those who wish to be reborn in my land should think of my name. If they can continue without rest, they will succeed in being reborn here.’”

The Buddha said, “Because of intent thinking, one will be reborn there. One should always think of Amitābha Buddha’s body with the thirty-two physical marks and the eighty excellent characteristics, unequaled in its majesty, radiating vast bright light to illuminate everywhere. He teaches, in the assembly of Bodhisattvas and bhikṣus, that dharmas [in true reality] are empty and, therefore, indestructible. Why? Because indestructible are all dharmas, such as form, pain, itch, thinking, perception, birth, death, consciousness, spirit, earth, water, fire, wind, the human world, and the heaven world, including Great Brahma Heaven. By thinking of a Buddha, one attains the Samādhi of Emptiness.”
“As an analogy, a handsome young man dressed in fine clothes wants to see his own face. He can see his reflection by looking into a hand mirror, pure oil, clear water, or a crystal. Does his reflection come from the outside into the mirror, oil, water, or crystal?”

Bhadrapāla replied, “No, it does not. God of Gods, it is because of the clarity of the mirror, oil, water, or crystal, that the man can see his reflection. His reflection comes from neither the inside [of the medium] nor the outside.”

The Buddha said, “Very good, Bhadrapāla. Because the medium is clear, the reflection is clear. Likewise, if one wishes to see a Buddha, one with a pure mind will be able to see. When one sees Him, one can ask questions, and He will give a reply. Having heard the teachings, one will be exultant and think: ‘Where does this Buddha come from and where am I going? As I think of this Buddha, He comes from nowhere and I am going nowhere. As I think of the desire realm, the form realm, and the formless realm, these three realms are formed by my mind. I can see what I think of. The mind forms a Buddha for itself to see; the mind is the Buddha mind. As my mind forms a Buddha, my mind is the Buddha; my mind is the Tathāgata; my mind is my body.’

“Although the mind sees a Buddha, the mind neither knows itself nor sees itself. The mind with perceptions is saṁsāra; the mind without perceptions is nirvāṇa. Dharmas as perceived are not something pleasurable. They are empty thoughts, nothing real. This is what Bodhisattvas see as they abide in this samādhi.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse:

The mind does not know itself; the mind does not see itself.
The mind that fabricates perceptions is false; the mind without perceptions is nirvāṇa.
Dharmas are not firm, only founded upon thinking.
Those who see emptiness with this understanding are free from perceptions and expectations.
I love this sutra. Along with Taming the Monkey Mind, this sutra sold me on Pure Land. Eventually I'll get around to re-reading it, but just seeing excerpts like this reminds me how incredibly clear the teachings are. Sections like these are perfect for showing how Pure Land Buddhism fits into the broader Mahayana and Mahayana philosophy.
:bow: :buddha1: :bow: :anjali: :meditate:

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PauloJ
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Re: Quotes from Pure Land Masters about non-self, impermanence and emptiness

Post by PauloJ » Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:29 am

Admin_PC wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:48 pm
Some quotes from the Pratyutpanna Samadhi Sutra:
The Buddha said, “Bodhisattvas in this land can see Amitābha Buddha by thinking intently only of Him. When they see Him, they can ask, ‘What Dharma should I uphold in order to be reborn in Your land?’ Amitābha Buddha will reply, ‘Those who wish to be reborn in my land should think of my name. If they can continue without rest, they will succeed in being reborn here.’”

The Buddha said, “Because of intent thinking, one will be reborn there. One should always think of Amitābha Buddha’s body with the thirty-two physical marks and the eighty excellent characteristics, unequaled in its majesty, radiating vast bright light to illuminate everywhere. He teaches, in the assembly of Bodhisattvas and bhikṣus, that dharmas [in true reality] are empty and, therefore, indestructible. Why? Because indestructible are all dharmas, such as form, pain, itch, thinking, perception, birth, death, consciousness, spirit, earth, water, fire, wind, the human world, and the heaven world, including Great Brahma Heaven. By thinking of a Buddha, one attains the Samādhi of Emptiness.”
“As an analogy, a handsome young man dressed in fine clothes wants to see his own face. He can see his reflection by looking into a hand mirror, pure oil, clear water, or a crystal. Does his reflection come from the outside into the mirror, oil, water, or crystal?”

Bhadrapāla replied, “No, it does not. God of Gods, it is because of the clarity of the mirror, oil, water, or crystal, that the man can see his reflection. His reflection comes from neither the inside [of the medium] nor the outside.”

The Buddha said, “Very good, Bhadrapāla. Because the medium is clear, the reflection is clear. Likewise, if one wishes to see a Buddha, one with a pure mind will be able to see. When one sees Him, one can ask questions, and He will give a reply. Having heard the teachings, one will be exultant and think: ‘Where does this Buddha come from and where am I going? As I think of this Buddha, He comes from nowhere and I am going nowhere. As I think of the desire realm, the form realm, and the formless realm, these three realms are formed by my mind. I can see what I think of. The mind forms a Buddha for itself to see; the mind is the Buddha mind. As my mind forms a Buddha, my mind is the Buddha; my mind is the Tathāgata; my mind is my body.’

“Although the mind sees a Buddha, the mind neither knows itself nor sees itself. The mind with perceptions is saṁsāra; the mind without perceptions is nirvāṇa. Dharmas as perceived are not something pleasurable. They are empty thoughts, nothing real. This is what Bodhisattvas see as they abide in this samādhi.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse:

The mind does not know itself; the mind does not see itself.
The mind that fabricates perceptions is false; the mind without perceptions is nirvāṇa.
Dharmas are not firm, only founded upon thinking.
Those who see emptiness with this understanding are free from perceptions and expectations.
I love this quote

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