The Writings of Nichiren

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:14 pm

Buddhism teaches that when the Buddha nature manifests itself from within, it will obtain protection from without. This is one of its fundamental principles. The Lotus Sutra says, I have profound reverence for you.’ The Nirvana Sutra states, ‘All living beings alike possess the Buddha nature.’ Bodhisattva Ashvaghosha’s Kishin ron3 says, ‘The essential truth of mind constantly permeates and exerts its influence. Therefore, when [the attainment of enlightenment] quickly causes illusions to cease to be, the body of the Law will manifest itself."4 Bodhisattva Miroku’s Yuga ron5 contains a similar statement. What is unseen will be rewarded with visible results.
The Three Kinds of Treasure

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/3KindsTreasure.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Thu Dec 12, 2019 12:42 pm

The urabon ceremony has its origins in the time when the Venerable Maudgalyayana saved his mother Shodai-nyo who, because of karmic retribution for her greed and stinginess, had fallen into the world of hunger for a period of five hundred lifetimes. However, he could not enable her to become a Buddha. That was because he himself was not yet a votary of the Lotus Sutra and thus could not help his mother attain Buddhahood. Later, in the eight-year assembly on Eagle Peak, he became a Buddha called Tamalapattra Sandalwood Fragrance by embracing the Lotus Sutra and chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. At that time, his mother became a Buddha as well.

You asked about making offerings of food to the hungry spirits. The third volume of the Lotus Sutra reads, "It is as if one came from a famished land and suddenly encountered a great king's feast." This passage means that the four great men of Learning, people of intermediate capacity, had not so much as heard of the choicest delicacy called ghee until the Lotus Sutra was expounded. Then, for the first time they savored ghee to their hearts' content, thus quickly bringing to an end the long-unsatisfied hunger in their hearts. Therefore, when you make offerings of food to the hungry spirits, you should recite the above passage from the sutra and chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo for their repose.
http://nichiren.info/gosho/OriginUrabon.htm

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/OriginUrabon.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Tue Dec 24, 2019 5:02 pm

Question: In the Latter Day of the Law, is it necessary for beginners in the practice of the Lotus Sutra to devote themselves to all three types of learning associated with the perfect teaching?

Answer: This is a very important question, and so I will be referring to the text of the sutra in answering you. In describing the first, second and third of the five stages of practice, the Buddha restricts those at these stages from practicing precepts and meditation, and places all emphasis upon the single factor of wisdom. And because our wisdom is inadequate, he teaches us to substitute faith, making this single word "faith" the foundation. Disbelief is the cause for becoming an icchantika and for slander of the True Law, while faith is the cause for wisdom and corresponds to the stage of myoji-soku.

T'ien-t'ai comments: "When a person has reached the stage of soji-soku, the benefits he has accrued will not be forgotten when he is reborn in another existence. But for persons at the stage of myoji-soku or kangyo-soku, those benefits will be forgotten when they are reborn in succeeding existences, though there may be some among them who do not forget. Even in the case of persons who have forgotten those benefits, if they should encounter a good friend, then the roots of goodness that they planted in their previous existences will be revived. But if they should encounter an evil friend, then they will lose their true mind."

This is probably what happened to the two eminent men of middle antiquity, the Great Teacher Jikaku and the Great Teacher Chisho of the Tendai sect. They turned their backs upon the teachings of T'ien-t'ai and Dengyo, who had been good friends to them, and instead transferred their allegiance to Shan-wu-wei and Pu-k'ung, who were evil friends. And many of the scholars in the Latter Day of the Law have been deluded by Eshin's introduction to his Ojo Yoshu and have as a result lost the true mind of faith in the Lotus Sutra, giving their allegiance instead to the provisional teachings represented by those associated with Amida. They are persons who have "abandoned the great and instead chosen the small." If we judge from examples in the past, they will probably suffer for countless kalpas in the three evil paths. It is persons such as this that T'ien-t'ai meant when he said: "If they should encounter an evil friend, then they will lose their true mind."

Question: What proof can you offer to support your claim?

Answer: Volume six of the Maka Shikan states: "Persons who are saved by the teachings preached previous to the Lotus Sutra are those who have reached a high level of attainment. The reason is because the teachings put forth in these sutras are mere expedients. Those saved by the perfect teaching of the Lotus Sutra belong to a low level of attainment, because this teaching represents the truth."

The Guketsu comments on this as follows: "This passage concerning the teachings preached previous to the Lotus Sutra makes clear the relative worth of the provisional and the true teachings, because it indicates that the truer the teaching, the lower the stage [of persons it can save]. And conversely, the more provisional the teaching, the higher must be the stage [of those who embrace it, in order for such persons to be saved]." And volume nine of the Hokke Mongu Ki says: "In determining a person's stage of attainment, the more profound the object of meditation, the lower will be the level of the practitioner [who can attain enlightenment thereby]."
On the Four Stages of Faith and the Five Stages of Practice

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/4StagesFaith ... actice.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Sat Dec 28, 2019 8:03 pm

he Venerable Maudgalyayana rescued his mother from the suffering of the realm of hungry spirits. However, he was only able to lead her to the worlds of Humanity and Heaven, and could not enable her to enter the path of attaining Buddhahood. Shakyamuni Buddha, at the age of thirty, expounded the Dharma to his father, King Shuddhodana, enabling him to attain the highest of the four fruits. And at the age of thirty-eight, he enabled his mother, Lady Maya, to attain the stage of arhat. Yet, while such deeds may resemble filial conduct, the Buddha was in fact thereby guilty of unfilial behavior, for, though he freed his parents from the six paths, he caused them to enter a path that would never lead to Buddhahood. This is like reducing a crown prince to the status of commoner, or like marrying a princess of royal blood to a man of lowly birth.

For this reason, the Buddha declared that, [had he only expounded the provisional teachings,] "I would have fallen into miserliness and greed, and such a thing would never do." Having given his parents a meal of boiled barley while begrudging them amrita, and having offered them unrefined sake while denying them refined sake, the Buddha had become the most unfilial of persons. Like King Virudhaka, he should have fallen alive into the great citadel of the hell of incessant suffering, and like King Ajatashatru, he should have contracted white leprosy in that very body. However, forty-two years [after he attained enlightenment], he expounded the Lotus Sutra, saying, "Though these persons may arouse thoughts of extinction and enter nirvana, yet in that land, seeking the Buddha wisdom, they will be able to hear this sutra." Because Shakyamuni expounded the Lotus Sutra in order to repay the dept of gratitude he owed to his father and mother, Taho Buddha, who had come from the Land of Treasure Purity, praised him as a Buddha of true filial piety. And the Buddhas of the ten directions assembled and declared him to be the most filial among all the Buddhas.
On Filial and Unfilial Conduct

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/FilialUnfilialConduct.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Wed Jan 01, 2020 8:31 am


I have received a hundred mushimochi cakes and a basket of fruit. New Year's Day marks the first day, the first month, the beginning of the year and the start of spring. A person who celebrates this day will gain virtue and be loved by all, just as the moon becomes full gradually, moving from west to east, and the sun shines more brightly traveling from east to west.

First of all, as to the question of where exactly hell and the Buddha exist, one sutra states that hell exists underground and another sutra says that the Buddha is in the west. However, closer examination reveals that both exist in our five-foot body. The reason I think so is that hell is in the heart of a man who inwardly despises his father and disregards his mother, just like the lotus seed, which contains both flower and fruit at the same time. In the same way, the Buddha dwells inside our hearts. For example, flint can produce fire and gems possess value in themselves. We common mortals can see neither our own eyebrows, which are so close, nor heaven in the distance. Likewise, we do not see that the Buddha exists in our own hearts. You may question how is it that the Buddha can reside within us when our bodies, originating from our parents' sperm and blood, are the source of the three poisons and the seat of the carnal desires. But repeated consideration shows the validity of my claim. The pure lotus flower blooms out of the muddy pond, the fragrant sandalwood grows from the soil, the graceful cherry blossoms come forth from trees, the beautiful Yang Kuei-fei was born of a maidservant, and the moon rises from behind the mountains to shed light on them. Misfortune comes from one's mouth and ruins him, but fortune comes from one's mind and makes him worthy of respect.

The sincerity of making offerings to the Lotus Sutra at the beginning of the New Year is like flowers blooming from trees, a lotus unfolding in a pond, sandalwood blossoming on the Snow mountains, or the moon beginning to rise. Japan, in becoming an enemy of the Lotus Sutra has now invited misfortune from a thousand miles afar, whereas those who believe in the Lotus Sutra will gather fortune from ten thousand miles afar. The shadow is cast by the body, and just as the shadow follows the body, misfortune will befall the country whose people are hostile to the Lotus Sutra. The believers in the Lotus Sutra, on the other hand are like the sandalwood endowed with fragrance. I will write you again.

Nichiren

The fifth day of the first month.

Major Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Vol. 1, page 271.
New Year's Gosho

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/NewYearGosho.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Mon Jan 06, 2020 4:07 am

In all worldly affairs, those who oppose their parents or who disobey their ruler incur the wrath of heaven for their unfilial or disloyal conduct. However, if one’s parent or ruler becomes an enemy of the Lotus Sutra, then disobedience is an act of filial piety and repays one’s debt of gratitude to the nation. Therefore, since I first read the Lotus Sutra, I have upheld my faith without faltering, even though my parents implored me with their palms joined to desist, though my teacher disowned me, and the regent twice exiled me7 and nearly put me to death. Because I persevered, there are now people who think my teachings may be true
The Royal Palace

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/RoyalPalace.htm

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:36 am

Boldly declare yourself a disciple of Nichiren

"In his present life, the lay priest does not appear to have had particularly strong faith in the Lotus Sutra. But due to the workings of his karma from the past, he has sunk into this long illness and now seeks the way day and night without cease. Any minor offenses he committed in this lifetime have probably already been eradicated, and the great evil of slander will also be extinguished because he has taken faith in the Lotus Sutra. If he were to go right now to Eagle Peak, he would be as delighted as if the sun had come out and he were able to see in all ten directions. He would rejoice, wondering how an early death could be so happy a thing. No matter what may happen on the road between this life and the next, he should declare himself to be a disciple of Nichiren. Although Japan is a tiny country, if one but announces that one is a vassal of the lord of Sagami, people will unaccountably fear one. I am the most unreasonable priest in Japan, but with regard to believing in the Lotus Sutra, I am the foremost sage in Jambudvīpa. My name resounds throughout the pure lands of the ten directions, and heaven and earth no doubt know it. If your husband declares that he is Nichiren’s disciple, I do not think that evil demons of any kind can claim ignorance of my name."

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:55 pm

At that time Shakyamuni Buddha caused the Buddhas who were emanations of his body and had come from the ten directions to return each one to his original land, saying: "Each of these Buddhas may proceed at his own pleasure. The tower of Many Treasures Buddha may also return to its former position."
Entrustment

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tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Thu Jan 30, 2020 2:08 pm

According to the teachings of the true sutra, when the world enters the latter age and Buddhism falls into complete disorder, a great sage will appear in the world. For example, the pine tree, which withstands the frost, is called the monarch of trees, and the chrysanthemum, which continues to bloom after other plants have withered, is known as a sacred plant. When the world is at peace, worthy men do not become apparent, but when the age is in turmoil, both sages and fools are revealed for what they are
A Father Takes Faith

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/FatherFaith.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Wed Feb 05, 2020 12:45 am

T'ien-t'ai said, "You must realize that the interrelated actions and reactions of sentient beings and their environments all manifest the law of simultaneity of cause and effect."2 Sentient beings and their environments" here means the reality of life and death. The law of simultaneity of cause and effect is clearly at work in everything that lives and dies.

The Great Teacher Dengyo said, "Birth and death are the mysterious workings of the life essence. The ultimate reality of life lies in existence and nonexistence."3 No phenomena -- heaven or earth, Yin or Yang4, the sun and moon, the five planets5, or any life-condition from Hell to Buddhahood -- are free from birth and death. Thus the life and death of all phenomena are simply the two phases of Myoho-renge-kyo. In his Maka Shikan, T'ien-t'ai says, "The emergence of all things is the manifestation of their intrinsic nature, and their extinction, the withdrawal of that nature into the state of latency."6 Shakyamuni and Taho Buddhas, too, are the two phases of life and death.
Heritage of the Ultimate Law of Life

--- > http://nichiren.info/gosho/HeritageUltimateLawLife.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Sun Feb 09, 2020 3:34 pm

You should not have the slightest fear in your heart. It is lack of courage that prevents one from attaining Buddhahood, although one may have professed faith in the Lotus Sutra many times since innumerable kalpas ago.

There is definitely something extraordinary in the ebb and flow of the tide, the rising and setting of the moon, and the way in which summer, autumn, winter and spring give way to each other. Something uncommon also occurs when an ordinary person attains Buddhahood. At such a time, the three obstacles and four devils will invariably appear, and the wise will rejoice while the foolish will retreat. I have long been waiting to tell you this, either through my own messenger or by some other means. So I greatly appreciate your sending these messengers to me. I am sure that if you were about to abandon your faith, you would not have sent them. Thinking it may still not be too late, I am writing this letter.

To attain Buddhahood is difficult indeed, more difficult than the feat of placing a needle atop the Mount Sumeru of this world and then casting a thread from atop the Mount Sumeru of another world directly through the eye of this needle. And the feat is even more difficult if it must be done in the face of a contrary wind. The Lotus Sutra states:

A million million ten thousand kalpas, an inconceivable time will pass before at last one can hear this Lotus Sutra. A million million ten thousand kalpas, an inconceivable time will pass before the Buddhas, World-Honored Ones, preach this sutra. Therefore its practitioners, after the Buddha has entered extinction, when they hear a sutra like this should entertain no doubts or perplexities. (LS20)

This passage is extremely unusual even among the twenty-eight chapters of the Lotus Sutra. From the first to the [tenth or] Hosshi chapters, human and heavenly beings, the four kinds of believers and the eight kinds of beings -- those at the stage of near-perfect enlightenment or below -- were many in number,9 but there was only one Buddha, the Thus Come One Shakyamuni. Thus, these chapters are of great import but may appear insignificant. The twelve chapters from the [eleventh,] Hoto to the [twenty-second,] Zokurui are the most important of all. This is because in the presence of Shakyamuni Buddha there appeared the treasure tower of Taho Buddha.10 It was as if the sun had risen in front of the moon. All the Buddhas in the ten directions were seated under the trees, and it seemed as though the light of a fire shone over all the grass and trees of the worlds in the ten directions. It was in this setting that the above passage was expounded.

The Nirvana Sutra states, "People have been suffering since numberless, uncountable kalpas ago. The bones each individual leaves behind in a kalpa pile up as high as Mount Vipula near Rajagriha, and the milk he sucks is equal to the water of the four seas.11 The blood one sheds surpasses the quantity of water in the four seas, and so do the tears he sheds in grief over the death of parents, brothers and sisters, wives, children and relatives. And though one used all the plants and trees growing on the earth to make four-inch tallies to count them, one could not count all the parents one has had in the past existences of life." These are the words the Buddha uttered lying in the grove of sal trees on the final day of his earthly life. You should pay the strictest attention to them. They mean that the number of parents who gave birth to you since innumerable kalpas ago could not be counted even with tallies made by cutting all the plants and trees growing on all the worlds of the ten directions into four-inch pieces.

Thus you have had a countless number of parents in your past existences, yet during that time you have never encountered the Lotus Sutra. From this we see that it is easy to have parents, but very difficult to encounter the Lotus Sutra. Now if you disobey the words of a parent, one who is easy to come by, and follow a friend of the Lotus Sutra, one who can rarely be encountered, you will not only be able to attain Buddhahood, but will also be able to lead to enlightenment the parent whom you disobeyed. For example, Prince Siddhartha12 was the eldest son of King Shuddhodana. His father wanted him to succeed to the throne and rule the nation, and actually made him crown prince, but the prince went against his father’s wishes and escaped from the palace at night. The king was angry at him for being unfilial, but after Siddhartha had attained Buddhahood, he set about first of all to convert his parents, King Shuddhodana and Lady Maya.
The Three Obstacles and Four Devils

---> http://nichiren.info/gosho/3Obstacles4Devils.htm

tkp67
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by tkp67 » Mon Feb 10, 2020 11:29 pm

sowing, maturing, and harvesting [種熟脱] ( shu-juku-datsu): The three-phase process by which a Buddha leads people to Buddhahood. In The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra, T’ien-t’ai (538–597) set forth this concept based on the Lotus Sutra, comparing the process of people attaining Buddhahood to the growth of a plant. In the first stage, “sowing,” the Buddha plants the seeds of Buddhahood in the lives of the people, just as a gardener sows seeds in the soil. Nichiren (1222–1282) states in The Essentials for Attaining Buddhahood, “The Buddha [is] like the sower, and the people like the field” (748). In the second stage, the Buddha nurtures the seeds he has planted by helping the people practice the teaching and leading them gradually to Buddhahood. This stage is compared to the gardener’s care for the sprouting and growth of a plant and is called “maturing.” In the third and final stage, the Buddha leads the people to reap the harvest of enlightenment, enabling them to attain Buddhahood. This is comparable to the gardener reaping the fruit of a plant and is called “harvesting.”
The process of sowing, maturing, and harvesting is described as taking place over countless kalpas. From the viewpoint of the essential teaching (latter half) of the Lotus Sutra, Shakyamuni first planted the seeds of enlightenment in the lives of his disciples numberless major world system dust particle kalpas in the past. He then nurtured them as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence major world system dust particle kalpas in the past and later as the Buddha in India by preaching the pre-Lotus Sutra teachings and the theoretical teaching (first half) of the Lotus Sutra. He finally brought them to fruition, or enlightenment, with the “Life Span” (sixteenth) chapter of the Lotus Sutra. Seen from this perspective, Shakyamuni’s essential teaching was expounded for the purpose of reaping the harvest of enlightenment and accordingly is called the teaching of the harvest. The pre-Lotus Sutra teachings and the theoretical teaching, through which Shakyamuni nurtured his disciples’ capacity for enlightenment, are regarded as the teaching of maturing. As a whole, Nichiren refers to Shakyamuni’s teachings as the Buddhism of the harvest.
In The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind, Nichiren states: “He [Shakyamuni] planted the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives in the remote past [numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and nurtured the seeds through his preaching as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence [major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and through the first four flavors of teachings [the pre-Lotus Sutra teachings] and the theoretical teaching in this life. Then with the essential teaching he brought his followers to the stage of near-perfect enlightenment and finally to that of perfect enlightenment” (369–70). In the same work, Nichiren writes: “The essential teaching of Shakyamuni’s lifetime and that revealed at the beginning of the Latter Day are both pure and perfect [in that both lead directly to Buddhahood]. Shakyamuni’s, however, is the Buddhism of the harvest, and this is the Buddhism of sowing. The core of his teaching is one chapter and two halves, and the core of mine is the five characters of the daimoku alone” (370). Though “one chapter and two halves” indicates that Shakyamuni planted the seeds of Buddhahood in the lives of his followers, the teaching of sowing is “hidden in the depths of the ‘Life Span’ chapter” of the Lotus Sutra. More specifically, it is hidden in the sentence “Originally I practiced the bodhisattva way.”
Nichiren referred to the hidden teaching as “the seed of Buddhahood, that is, the three thousand realms in a single moment of life” in The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind (365). In The Opening of the Eyes, he writes: “This is the doctrine of original cause and original effect. It reveals that the nine worlds are all present in beginningless Buddhahood and that Buddhahood is inherent in the beginningless nine worlds. This is the true mutual possession of the Ten Worlds, the true hundred worlds and thousand factors, the true three thousand realms in a single moment of life” (235). This indicates the eternal Mystic Law that enables people to reveal Buddhahood from their beginningless nine worlds. Originally Shakyamuni practiced the bodhisattva way as a common mortal with this Law as his teacher and thus realized and manifested his inherent Buddhahood.
In contrast with Shakyamuni’s Buddhism, Nichiren identified his teaching as the Buddhism of sowing and defined the daimoku of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as the teaching for planting the seeds of enlightenment. Because Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the law of the simultaneity of cause and effect, it contains within it all three stages of sowing, maturing, and harvesting. The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra refers to two types of people: those who [received the seeds of Buddhahood and] have good roots and those who do not. According to Nichiren, people in the Latter Day of the Law never received the seeds of Buddhahood from the Buddha in the past and must therefore first receive the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives. Then they can complete the whole process of maturing and harvesting in this lifetime. Nichiren established the object of devotion called the Gohonzon, embodying in it the Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as a means for people to plant the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives and reap the fruit of Buddhahood. In Nichiren’s teaching, the practice for doing so involves chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with faith in the Gohonzon. See also teacher of the true cause; teacher of the true effect.
sowing, maturing, and harvesting [種熟脱] ( shu-juku-datsu)

---> https://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/dic/Content/S/244

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Tue Feb 11, 2020 8:07 pm

tkp67 wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 11:29 pm
sowing, maturing, and harvesting [種熟脱] ( shu-juku-datsu): The three-phase process by which a Buddha leads people to Buddhahood. In The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra, T’ien-t’ai (538–597) set forth this concept based on the Lotus Sutra, comparing the process of people attaining Buddhahood to the growth of a plant. In the first stage, “sowing,” the Buddha plants the seeds of Buddhahood in the lives of the people, just as a gardener sows seeds in the soil. Nichiren (1222–1282) states in The Essentials for Attaining Buddhahood, “The Buddha [is] like the sower, and the people like the field” (748). In the second stage, the Buddha nurtures the seeds he has planted by helping the people practice the teaching and leading them gradually to Buddhahood. This stage is compared to the gardener’s care for the sprouting and growth of a plant and is called “maturing.” In the third and final stage, the Buddha leads the people to reap the harvest of enlightenment, enabling them to attain Buddhahood. This is comparable to the gardener reaping the fruit of a plant and is called “harvesting.”
The process of sowing, maturing, and harvesting is described as taking place over countless kalpas. From the viewpoint of the essential teaching (latter half) of the Lotus Sutra, Shakyamuni first planted the seeds of enlightenment in the lives of his disciples numberless major world system dust particle kalpas in the past. He then nurtured them as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence major world system dust particle kalpas in the past and later as the Buddha in India by preaching the pre-Lotus Sutra teachings and the theoretical teaching (first half) of the Lotus Sutra. He finally brought them to fruition, or enlightenment, with the “Life Span” (sixteenth) chapter of the Lotus Sutra. Seen from this perspective, Shakyamuni’s essential teaching was expounded for the purpose of reaping the harvest of enlightenment and accordingly is called the teaching of the harvest. The pre-Lotus Sutra teachings and the theoretical teaching, through which Shakyamuni nurtured his disciples’ capacity for enlightenment, are regarded as the teaching of maturing. As a whole, Nichiren refers to Shakyamuni’s teachings as the Buddhism of the harvest.
In The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind, Nichiren states: “He [Shakyamuni] planted the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives in the remote past [numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and nurtured the seeds through his preaching as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence [major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and through the first four flavors of teachings [the pre-Lotus Sutra teachings] and the theoretical teaching in this life. Then with the essential teaching he brought his followers to the stage of near-perfect enlightenment and finally to that of perfect enlightenment” (369–70). In the same work, Nichiren writes: “The essential teaching of Shakyamuni’s lifetime and that revealed at the beginning of the Latter Day are both pure and perfect [in that both lead directly to Buddhahood]. Shakyamuni’s, however, is the Buddhism of the harvest, and this is the Buddhism of sowing. The core of his teaching is one chapter and two halves, and the core of mine is the five characters of the daimoku alone” (370). Though “one chapter and two halves” indicates that Shakyamuni planted the seeds of Buddhahood in the lives of his followers, the teaching of sowing is “hidden in the depths of the ‘Life Span’ chapter” of the Lotus Sutra. More specifically, it is hidden in the sentence “Originally I practiced the bodhisattva way.”
Nichiren referred to the hidden teaching as “the seed of Buddhahood, that is, the three thousand realms in a single moment of life” in The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind (365). In The Opening of the Eyes, he writes: “This is the doctrine of original cause and original effect. It reveals that the nine worlds are all present in beginningless Buddhahood and that Buddhahood is inherent in the beginningless nine worlds. This is the true mutual possession of the Ten Worlds, the true hundred worlds and thousand factors, the true three thousand realms in a single moment of life” (235). This indicates the eternal Mystic Law that enables people to reveal Buddhahood from their beginningless nine worlds. Originally Shakyamuni practiced the bodhisattva way as a common mortal with this Law as his teacher and thus realized and manifested his inherent Buddhahood.
In contrast with Shakyamuni’s Buddhism, Nichiren identified his teaching as the Buddhism of sowing and defined the daimoku of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as the teaching for planting the seeds of enlightenment. Because Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the law of the simultaneity of cause and effect, it contains within it all three stages of sowing, maturing, and harvesting. The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra refers to two types of people: those who [received the seeds of Buddhahood and] have good roots and those who do not. According to Nichiren, people in the Latter Day of the Law never received the seeds of Buddhahood from the Buddha in the past and must therefore first receive the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives. Then they can complete the whole process of maturing and harvesting in this lifetime. Nichiren established the object of devotion called the Gohonzon, embodying in it the Law of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as a means for people to plant the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives and reap the fruit of Buddhahood. In Nichiren’s teaching, the practice for doing so involves chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with faith in the Gohonzon. See also teacher of the true cause; teacher of the true effect.
sowing, maturing, and harvesting [種熟脱] ( shu-juku-datsu)

---> https://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/dic/Content/S/244
This is not correct:

The Buddhism of the Sowing and the Buddhism of the Harvest

The original manuscript of the Kanjin Honzon Sho [True Object of Worship] is designated a National Treasure by the Japanese government and is kept in the treasure storehouse of the Hokekyoju Temple in Ichikawa City, Japan. The document is considered crucial to the understanding of Nichiren Daishonin. Nichiren refers to the treatise as being of the "utmost importance".

The Kanjin Honzon Sho from the Major Works of the SGI is translated from the Gosho Zenshu which is the modern Japanese translation of the original Chinese and medieval Japanese Gosho translated by Nichiren Shoshu priests. One should note that the Nichiren Shoshu and the SGI are the only Nichiren sects that advocate Nichiren as True Buddha and the only sects that rely on Gosho Zenshu. The Major Works translation reads:

"The “Teacher of the Law” chapter of the Lotus Sutra states, “Since hatred and jealousy toward this sutra abound even when the Thus Come One is in the world, how much more will this be so after his passing?” The “Treasure Tower” chapter states, “They [the Buddhas] make certain that the Law will long endure. . . . [The Thus Come One Many Treasures, I myself ], and these emanation Buddhas who have gathered here, surely know this is our aim.” Look at what the “Encouraging Devotion” and “Peaceful Practices” chapters state about the future. The theoretical teaching was preached for the people after Shakyamuni Buddha’s passing.

As regards the essential teaching, it was addressed exclusively to the people early in the Latter Day of the Law. On the surface, the Buddha seems to have preached this teaching for the enlightenment of the people of his day; he planted the seeds of Buddhahood in their lives in the remote past [numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and nurtured the seeds through his preaching as the sixteenth son of the Buddha Great Universal Wisdom Excellence [major world system dust particle kalpas ago] and through the first four flavors of teachings and the theoretical teaching in this life. Then with the essential teaching he brought his followers to the stage of near-perfect enlightenment and finally to that of perfect enlightenment.

In actuality, however, the essential teaching bears no resemblance whatsoever to the theoretical teaching. The preparation, revelation, and transmission of the essential teaching are intended entirely for the beginning of the Latter Day of the Law. The essential teaching of Shakyamuni’s lifetime and that revealed at the beginning of the Latter Day are both pure and perfect [in that both lead directly to Buddhahood]. Shakyamuni’s, however, is the Buddhism of the harvest, and this is the Buddhism of sowing. The core of his teaching is one chapter and two halves, and the core of mine is the five characters of the daimoku alone." Kanjin Honzon Sho (SGI Major Works ) pp 169-170

The Kanjin Honzon from the NOPPA translation of the Nichiren Shu is translated directly from the Showa Tehon which is a copy of the original collection of Gosho written in Chinese and medieval Japanese. The NOPPA translation reads.

"It is stated in the tenth chapter of the Lotus Sutra, 'The Teacher of the Dharma': 'This sutra has aroused much hatred and jealousy even in the lifetime of the Buddha. How much more can this be expected after His death!' And in the eleventh chapter, 'Appearance of the Stupa of Treasures': 'Taho Buddha and the Buddhas in manifestation (funjin Buddhas) from all the worlds in the universe gathered together to make this dharma live forever....Buddhas in manifestation should remember My (the Buddha's) intention to keep on spreading the dharma forever.'You may find similar statements in the thirteen chapter, 'Encouragement for Upholding this Sutra', and fourteenth chapter, 'Peaceful Practices'. They show that the theoretical section of the Lotus Sutra is directed to those in the beginning of the Latter Age.

The essential section of the Lotus Sutra is preached solely for those living in the beginning of the Latter Age. At first glance it appears that the seed of Buddhahood was planted in them by the Eternal Buddha in the eternal past or 500 dust particle kalpa ago. The seed germinated and grew within them with the help of all the sutras from the Lotus Sutra preached by the sixteenth prince of Daitsuchisho Buddha in 3,000 dust particle kalpa in the past to all those preached by Sakyamuni in his life before the Lotus Sutra and the theoretical section of the Lotus Sutra. Finally the essential section of the Lotus Sutra enabled them to attain Buddhahood.

On closer examination, however, the essential section differs from the theoretical section. That is to say the essential section, all through the prologue, the main discourse, and the epilogue, was preached for those people in the beginning of the Latter Age of the Decadent Dharma. The teaching of the essential section during the lifetime of Sakyamuni Buddha and that which would spread in the beginning of the Latter Age are likewise absolutely perfect. However the former is for attaining enlightenment, whereas the latter is for sowing the seed of Buddhahood. While the former is crystallized in the sixteenth chapter, 'Duration of the Life of the Buddha', with half a chapter each preceding and following it, the latter is solely embodied in the five characters of Myo, Ho, Ren, Ge, and Kyo, the title of the Lotus Sutra." Kanjin Honzon Sho, Nichiren Shu (NOPPA 1991) pp 120 - 122;

What was referred to by Nichiren as "the teaching for attaining enlightenment" [MW - Buddhism of the Harvest] is the teaching by the historical Buddha during his lifetime, i.e., his spoken words to his disciples. In the Age of Mappo we can only rely on the Lotus Sutra but the manner of its faith, practice, and propagation in the Age of Mappo differs from that of the historical Buddha during his lifetime. We rely on the Daimoku transmitted by the Buddha to the Bodhisattvas from underground who are commissioned to expound the Lotus Sutra in this Age of Mappo. In Chapter 15 of the Lotus Sutra, the various provisional Bodhisattvas from this and other worlds ask to expound the Lotus Sutra. However, the Buddha demurs saying, "I do not want you to uphold this sutra...." Kanjin Honzon Sho, Nichiren Shu (NOPPA 1991) p 124; MW p 172.

Nichiren, referencing Tien-tai, discusses this rejection: "After all, Sakyamuni Buddha could not reveal his innermost enlightenment, or the great dharma hidden in the lines of the Duration of the Life of the Buddha Chapter [Chapter 16] to those great bodhisattvas from other worlds who had been guided by the teaching of the theoretical section." Kanjin Honzon Sho, Nichiren Shu (NOPPA 1991) p 126; MW 173.

Nichiren continues, explaining that in this Age of Mappo, the essence of the Lotus Sutra, Myo Ho Renge Kyo is taught to the people by the Bodhisattvas from underground, who are the original disciples of Sakyamuni Buddha:

"Lands at the beginning of the Latter Age slander the true dharma and those who live there have poor capacity for comprehension and faith in Buddhism. Therefore, instead of relying on Buddhas from other worlds, the Buddha called out great bodhisattvas from underground to entrust them with the task of transmitting the five characters of Myo, Ho, Ren, Ge, and Kyo, the essence of the 'Duration of the Life of the Buddha' chapter, to the people in this world. It meant also that those guided by the teaching of the theoretical section were not the original disciples of Sakyamuni Buddha." Kanjin Honzon Sho, Nichiren Shu (NOPPA 1991) p 126; MW 173.

"Having thus manifested the ten divine powers, Sakyamuni Buddha transmitted the five characters of Myo, Ho, Ren, Ge, and Kyo to the original disciples of the Buddha since the eternal past, who had sprung up from underground." Kanjin Honzon Sho, Nichiren Shu (NOPPA 1991) p 140; MW 176.

"Tien-tai comments on this in his 'Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra': Following 'Thereupon Sakyamuni Buddha said to the host of bodhisattvas' is the third section of the chapter on the Divine Powers, summarizing the essence of the Lotus Sutra and transmitting it to the bodhisattvas from underground." Kanjin Honzon Sho, Nichiren Shu (NOPPA 1991) p 142; MW I:76.

"The manifestation of the ten divine powers in the 21st chapter on the 'Divine Powers' is for the sake of transmitting the five characters of Myo, Ho, Ren, Ge Kyo to the four bodhisattvas of Jogyo, Muhengyo, Jyogyo and Anryugyo, representing the host of bodhisattvas who had sprung from underground." Kanjin Honzon Sho, Nichiren Shu (NOPPA 1991) p 142; MW I:76-77.

Nichiren goes on to explain that the time had only just arrived for the bodhisattvas from underground to appear and propagate Myoho Renge Kyo, the excellent medicine for the Latter Age:

"Now we are at the beginning of the Latter Age of the Decadent Dharma, when Hinayana teachings strike down Mahayana teachings, provisional teachings destroy true teachings, east is taken for west and west for east, and heaven and earth are upside down. Under these circumstances, the four ranks of bodhisattva-teachers who preach the theoretical section of the Lotus Sutra remain in hiding. Gods desert the land which they are supposed to protect. Then, for the first time, those bodhisattvas from underground appear in this world to encourage ignorant people to take the five characters of Myo, Ho, Ren, Ge, and Kyo, the excellent medicine of the Latter Age. Many ignorant people would fall into hell by slandering the five characters, but they would be saved eventually. (NOPPA) pp. 143

The meaning of the Buddhism of the Sowing and the Buddhism of the Harvest is not that there are two different Buddhisms, the Buddhism of Shakyamuni and the Buddhism of Nichiren Daishonin. It means that this Latter Day is for sowing the seeds of Buddhahood, not for harvesting the seeds.

In more concise form:

Soka Gakkai mistranslates Nichiren Daishonin's most important writing, The True Object of Worship, in several places because their translation is derived from the Fuji School's modern Japanese (and sectarian) Gosho Zenshu. For example:

"The essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra and true Buddhism are both pure teachings that lead directly to Buddhahood. However, Shakyamuni's is the Buddhism of the harvest, and this is the Buddhism of sowing. The core of his teachings is one chapter and two halves, and for me is Myoho-renge-kyo alone." (MW vol I Kanjin No Honzon Sho, p. 72)

Kyotsu Hori's and Sench Murano's translations are more faithful translations because they are based on the original Chinese found in the non-sectarian Showa Tehon collection of Gosho:

Kyotsu Hori: "The teaching of the essential section section during the the lifetime of Sakyamuni Buddha and that which would spread in the beginning of the Latter Day are likewise absolutely perfect. However, the former is for attaining enlightenment, whereas the latter is for sowing the seeds of Buddhahood. While the former is crystallized in the sixteenth chapter, 'Duration of the Life of the Buddha', with half a chapter each preceding it and following it, the latter is solely embodied in the five characters of myo, ho, ren, ge, kyo." [pg. 122]

Senchu Murano: "It is evident that the Revelation of Eternity was preached for the sake of us who live at the beginning of the period of Deprivation. In this respect, we are as blessed as those who heard the Buddha in person, the only difference is that they brought to fruit their seeds of Buddhahood by hearing directly the 'One Chapter and Two Halves', whereas we are endowed with the seeds of Buddhahood by receiving the Five Words." (Five Major Writings of Nichiren, Sench Murano translation, Kanjin No Honzon Sho, p. 37)

Mark

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Feb 22, 2020 1:52 am

The SGI/NST Gosho Zenshu is NOT an excellent compilation of Nichiren's writings and Nichiren on translations and translators

"The Gosho Zenshu is NOT an excellent compilation of Nichiren's writings. NO ONE in any scholastic circles uses it because it is so sectarian and unreliable. It also recklessly mixes forged letters with authentic letters of Nichiren, so there is no way of knowing which is which. In fact, the Gosho Zenshu has a disclaimer in the preface, which says, "This collection includes virtually all the writings that have since of old been treated as Gosho, WHETHER THEIR AUTHENTICITY HAS BEEN CONFIRMED OR NOT."

"Answer: In the case of Kumārajīva, there is actual proof [attesting to the validity of his translations]. But no such proof exists in the case of Pu-k’ung."

The Tripitaka Master Pu-k’ung’s translation of The Rules of Rituals Based on the Lotus Sutra indicates that the Lotus Sutra does in fact contain mudras and mantras. Similarly, the translation of the Benevolent Kings Sutra by Kumārajīva contains no mudras or mantras, but a later translation of the same sutra by Pu-k’ung does contain mudras and mantras."

“Thus it came about that the translation of the Lotus Sutra made by the Tripitaka Master Kumārajīva in particular spread easily throughout China. And that is why, when the Great Teacher Kompon [Dengyō] of Enryaku-ji attacked the teachings of the other schools, he refuted them by saying, ‘We have proof in the fact that the tongue of the Tripitaka Master Kumārajīva, the translator of the Lotus Sutra, was not consumed by the flames. The sutras that you rely upon are all in error.’

"Eventually Kumārajīva died and was cremated, and his impure body was completely reduced to ashes. Only his tongue remained, resting atop a blue lotus that had sprung up in the midst of the flames. It sent out shining rays of five-colored light that made the night as bright as day and in the daytime outshone the rays of the sun. This, then, is why the sutras translated by all the other scholars came to be held in little esteem, while those translated by Kumārajīva, particularly his translation of the Lotus Sutra, spread rapidly throughout China.81

Question: That tells us about the translators who lived at the time of Kumārajīva or before. But what about later translators such as Shan-wu-wei or Pu-k’ung?
Answer: Even in the case of translators who lived after Kumārajīva, if their tongues burned up when they were cremated, it means that there are errors in their work. The Dharma Characteristics school in earlier times enjoyed a great popularity in Japan. But the Great Teacher Dengyō attacked it, pointing out that, though the tongue of Kumārajīva was not consumed by the flames, those of Hsüan-tsang and Tz’u-en burned along with their bodies. Emperor Kammu, impressed by his argument, transferred his allegiance to the Tendai Lotus school.

In the third and ninth volumes of the Nirvana Sutra, we find the Buddha predicting that when his teachings are transmitted from India to other countries many errors will be introduced into them, and the chances for people to gain enlightenment through them will be reduced. Therefore, the Great Teacher Miao-lo remarks: “Whether or not the teachings are grasped correctly depends upon the persons who transmit them. It is not determined by the sage’s original pronouncements.”82

He is saying that no matter how the people of today may follow the teachings of the sutras in hopes of a better life in the hereafter, if the sutras they follow are in error, then they can never attain enlightenment. But that is not to be attributed to any fault of the Buddha."

“When the Buddhist sutras and teachings were brought from India to China, the manner of translation depended upon the inclination of the particular translator, and there were no fixed translations for the sutras and treatises. Hence the Tripitaka Master Kumārajīva of the Later Ch’in dynasty always used to say: ‘When I examine the Buddhist teachings as they exist in China, I find that in many cases they differ from the Sanskrit originals. If the sutra translations that I have produced are free from error, then, after I am dead and cremated, my body, since it is impure, will no doubt be consumed by the flames, but my tongue alone will not be burned.’ And when he was finally cremated, his body was reduced to a pile of bones, but his tongue alone remained, resting on top of a blue lotus blossom and emitting a brilliant light that outshone the rays of the sun. What a wonderful thing!

“Thus it came about that the translation of the Lotus Sutra made by the Tripitaka Master Kumārajīva in particular spread easily throughout China. And that is why, when the Great Teacher Kompon [Dengyō] of Enryaku-ji attacked the teachings of the other schools, he refuted them by saying, ‘We have proof in the fact that the tongue of the Tripitaka Master Kumārajīva, the translator of the Lotus Sutra, was not consumed by the flames. The sutras that you rely upon are all in error.’

“Again, in the Nirvana Sutra the Buddha says that, when his teachings are transmitted to other countries, many errors are bound to be introduced into them. Even if among sutra passages we were to find the Lotus Sutra characterized as useless, or Shakyamuni Buddha described as a Buddha lost in the region of darkness, we should inquire very carefully to see whether the text that makes such statements belongs to the provisional teachings or the true teaching, to the Mahayana or the Hinayana, whether it was preached in the earlier or the later part of the Buddha’s life, and who the translator was."

This is not simply an opinion of my own. On Questions about the Practical Aspect of Precepts10 states, “Fading in later ages, illuminating former ages.” By “illuminating former ages,” it means that Kumārajīva’s wisdom threw light on the translations done by the men who lived from the Later Han to the Later Ch’in dynasties. By “fading in later ages,” it means that the translators who came after Kumārajīva such as Shan-wu-wei, Chin-kang-chih, and Pu-k’ung, because they had Kumārajīva’s wisdom to illuminate them, were somewhat cleverer than the earlier ones.

Practical Aspect of Precepts also says, “All the men who came after him [Kumārajīva] had to rely on his works.”

Thus, although Mind Aspiring for Enlightenment may be the work of Nāgārjuna, the word “only” in the passage I have discussed earlier represents a private opinion inserted in the text by Pu-k’ung. And even more erroneous is the statement that follows, namely, that such doctrines are not to be found in the other types of teachings."

"In addition, there are the tastes and intentions of the translators to be considered. Some favor detailed treatment and frown on conciseness; others prefer concise treatment and dislike abundant detail. For example, Hsüan-tsang favored detailed discussion, and so when he translated the Wisdom Sutra, which was in forty volumes in the original, into Chinese, his translation came to six hundred volumes. The Tripitaka Master Kumārajīva, on the other hand, preferred conciseness, and so his translation of Great Perfection of Wisdom, a thousand volumes in the original, was reduced in translation to a hundred volumes. It is thus very difficult to decide which sutra, the Lotus or the Mahāvairochana, is superior simply on the basis of which describes mudras and mantras.

Kumārajīva’s translation of the Lotus Sutra does not consider mudras and mantras to be of prime importance [and hence omits mention of them]. But The Rules of Rituals Based on the Lotus Sutra, translated by the Tripitaka Master Pu-k’ung, includes a discussion of mudras and mantras. Kumārajīva’s translation of the Benevolent Kings Sutra makes no mention of mudras and mantras, but Pu-k’ung’s translation of the same sutra has added a discussion of these matters. Thus we know that such differences are due to the taste and intention of the translator."

"It should be noted, however, that there was a total of 187 translators who carried out the task of transmitting the sutras from India to the land of China. With the exception of one man, the Tripitaka Master Kumārajīva, all the others, when they produced their translations, added water to the milk of the teachings and mixed poison with the medicine. But the various teachers and half-baked scholars, failing to understand this fact, do not realize that even if they were to recite the entire body of sutras or commit to memory all the twelve divisions of the scriptures, they would still find it difficult to escape the sufferings of birth and death."

Nichiren taught and warned about faulty translations and self-serving translators in India and China. Nikko too, in his Twenty Six Articles. Nichiren also spoke of the particular depravity of the Japanese translators. There is no doubt that Nichiren Shoshu and Soka Gakkai translations, in particular, are faked in order to promote their heterodox doctrines.

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Feb 22, 2020 1:57 am

The Nichiren Shu of North America's [NONA] translations are superior to the Nichiren Shoshu's International Center... A discussion circa 1996 on Google Group Alternate Religion Buddhism Nichiren

[NSIC] translations
NSIC = Nichiren Shoshu International Center
NONA = Nichiren Shu of North America

Dave Cole: No actually that is Major Writings I quoted. Your translation sucks.
John Petry: Citation please? When did you become an expert?
DC: I became an expert when I promised, you became a empty shell when you abandoned faith.
JP: Never mind the chest puffing. Let's have the citations for your opinion.
DC: The citations? I already said twice, it is from the Major Writings here it is again, you know Watson et. all. MW-5, 207, Letter of Petition from Yorimoto"

"The Lotus Sutra states, 'Now this threefold world is all my domain. The living beings in it are all my children.' If this scriptural statement is correct, then Lord Shakyamuni is the father and mother, teacher and sovereign of all the people in Japan. Amida Buddha does not possess these three virtues. However, you ignore the Buddha of the three virtues and invoke the name of another Buddha [Amida] day and night, morning and evening, sixty or eighty thousand times a day. Is this not an unfilial deed? It was Shakyamuni Buddha himself who originally taught that Amida had vowed to save all people; but in the end he regretted it and said, 'I alone can save them.' After that, he never again taught that there are two or three Buddhas who can save the people. No one has two fathers or two mothers. What sutra says that Amida is the father of this country? What treatise indicates him as its mother? [NSIC version, page 225]

"So I listened to the sermons of various priests and inquired into which teaching leads to Buddhahood. And I came to believe that, according to the teaching of the Lotus Sutra, the sage Nichiren is the sovereign of the threefold world, the father and mother of all people, and the emissary of Shakyamuni Buddha - Bodhisattva Jogyo." [NSIC version, page 227]

"When the sage Nichiren, the envoy of Shakyamuni Buddha, was exiled because of the false charges leveled against him by the priest Ryokan, fighting broke out within one hundred days, just as he had predicted - and a great number of warriors perished." [NSIC version, page 231]

JP: The wonderful thing about the NSIC translations is that they try hard to fiddle with the wording to make it conform to NST/SGI doctrine. But they often then have glaring inconsistencies in them which show the errors. A comparison of the English in the above shows that the NONA version is a more exact translation and the NSIC version has fiddled with the language.

The Japanese version shows that it should read:

"As a result I have come to believe in the Lotus Sutra in which it is expounded that Nichiren Shonin is the Bodhisattva Jogyo [Superior Conduct] commanded by Sakyamuni Buddha, Lord of the Saha World and parent of all living beings, to appear in the Latter Days of the Degeneration as a messenger of the Buddha with the duty of propagating the Lotus Sutra. NONA translation, page 206 [the Japanese language version is on page 207].

If we look at the NSIC version we see that the changing of the language to make Nichiren "the sovereign of the threefold world, the father and mother of all people" [NSIC version, page 227] is inarticulate and contradictory to other statements in the Gosho itself. The most immediate conflict arise in the next phrase: "and the emissary of Shakyamuni Buddha - Bodhisattva Jogyo." [NSIC version, page 227] Were this language to be read as Dave would like, namely that it makes Nichiren the "true" Buddha, it would then make the "true" Buddha subordinate to Sakyamuni Buddha [Sakyamuni the Honbutsu or the Eternal OriginalBuddha of the 16th Chapter] since Nichiren is his [Sakyamuni's] emissary, the Bodhisattva Jogyo.

The NONA translation is further reinforced simply by looking at other language in the Gosho as translated by the NSIC:

"The Lotus Sutra states, 'Now this threefold world is all my domain. The living beings in it are all my children.' If this scriptural statement is correct, then Lord Shakyamuni is the father and mother, teacher and sovereign of all the people in Japan."

The writer clearly believes this statement about Sakyamuni being the parent teacher and sovereign as true as he immediately states:

"Amida Buddha does not possess these three virtues. However, you ignore the Buddha of the three virtues and invoke the name of another Buddha [Amida] day and night, morning and evening, sixty or eighty thousand times a day. Is this not an unfilial deed? It was Shakyamuni Buddha himself who originally taught that Amida had vowed to save all people; but in the end he regretted it and said, "I alone can save them.' After that, he never again taught that there are two or three Buddhas who can save the people. No one has two fathers or two mothers. What sutra says that Amida is the father of this country? What treatise indicates him as its mother?"

Similarly if Sakyamuni is the parent, teacher and sovereign, then Nichiren cannot be for the same question arises as posed by Nichiren in the above passage. What person can have two mothers?; two fathers?; two sovereigns?; two teachers?

[in the Japanese sense of a sensei]. The correctness of the NONA translation is confirmed later in the NSIC version when it states the following:

"When the sage Nichiren, the envoy of Shakyamuni Buddha, was exiled because of the false charges leveled against him by the priest Ryokan, fighting broke out within one hundred days, just as he had predicted - and a great number of warriors perished." NSIC version page 231.

Note that the above quote is very similar to the NONA translation:

"In the eighth year of the Bun'ei Era [1271] when Nichiren Shonin, messenger of Sakyamuni Buddha, was exiled because of the slander of Ryokan-bo, a civil war broke out within one hundred days, as Nichiren predicted, and not a few warriors lost their lives." NONA translation, page 214.

Similarly the language for the first passage is almost identical:

"The chapter on the 'Parable' of the Lotus Sutra states: 'Now this Saha World is all my domain, where all living beings are my children.' If this is true, Lord Sakyamuni Buddha is the father, the master and the lord of all the people in Japan. Amida Buddha has no such three virtues as Sakyamuni Buddha. Never the less, people put aside this Buddha with three virtues, enshrine Amida Buddha and chant 'Namu Amida Butsu' 60,000 or 80,000 times every morning and evening. How can it not be an unfilial act?

Amida Buddha's original vow was originally expounded by Sakyamuni Buddha. As it was, however, an expedient teaching, it was stated later in the Lotus Sutra: 'I, Sakyamuni, alone can save all living beings.' The only Buddha who can save us, therefore is the very Sakyamuni Buddha. Sakyamuni never seems to have appointed two or three saviors; we do not have two father or two mothers, do we? Is there any sutra in the world that asserts Amida Buddha is the father of this country? Is there any commentary that mentions Amida Buddha is the mother of this country?"

Dave's theory falls yet again when the Gosho states:

"In your official letter you also state, "I revere the elder of Gokuraku-ji temple as the World-Honored One reborn," but this I cannot accept. The reason is: if what the sutra states is true, the sage Nichiren is the envoy of the Buddha who attained enlightenment in the remote past, the provisional manifestation of Bodhisattva Jogyo, the votary of the essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra, and the great leader in the fifth five-hundred-year period [following the Buddha's passing]. [NSIC version, page 217]

The differences here are subtle but it still supports the NONA translation:

"It is also stated in your lordship's letter that your lordship reveres Ryokan-bo, Chief Priest of the Gokurakuji Temple, as if he were an incarnation of Sakyamuni Buddha. However this is hard for me to accept for if the teaching of the sutras is correct, Nichiren is a reincarnation of Bodhisattva Visistacarita [Superior Practice], a practitioner of the Lotus Sutra and a direct disciple of the Original and Eternal Sakyamuni Buddha who attained Buddhahood in the remotest past, according to the essential part of the Lotus Sutra. Nichiren Shonin is a great leading master in the beginning of the fifth 500 year period after the Buddha's extinction." NONA translation, page 184.

The NSIC version seeks to perpetuate a meaningless and unsubstantiated distinction between the remote past and the remotest past based upon a very strained reading of the 16th chapter of the Lotus Sutra. One that even the simplest reader can see is incorrect. In fact Prof. Burton who did the NSA translation of the Lotus Sutra indicates that the NONA version "the remotest" [or infinite] past is the correct interpretation.

"But as Ananda proceeds to describe the staggering number and variety of human, non human and heavenly beings who have gathered to listen to the Buddha's discourse, we realize that we have left the world of factual reality behind. This is the first point to keep in mind in reading the Lotus Sutra. Its setting, its vast assembly of listeners, its dramatic occurrences in the end belong to a realm that totally transcends our ordinary concepts of time, space and possibility.

Again and again we are told of events that took place countless, indescribable numbers of kalpas or eons in the past, or of beings or worlds that are as numerous as the sands of million and billions of Ganges rivers. Such "numbers" are in fact no more than pseudo-numbers or non-numbers, intended to impress on us the impossibility of measuring the immeasurable. They are not meant to convey any statistical data but simply to boggle the mind and jar it lose from its conventional concepts of time and space. For in the realm of Emptiness, time and space as we conceive them are meaningless; anywhere is the same as everywhere, and now, then, never, forever are all one."

On page xix: " In chapter sixteen Sakyamuni reveals the answer to this riddle. The Buddha he says is an eternal being, ever present in the world, ever concerned for the salvation of all living beings. He attained Buddhahood an incalculably distant time in the past and has never ceased to abide in the world since then. ... From this we see that in the Lotus Sutra the Buddha who had earlier been viewed as a historical personality, is now conceived as a being who transcends all boundaries of time and space, an ever abiding principle of truth and compassion that exists everywhere and within all beings." [Watson preface to the Lotus Sutra]

This shoots down the meaningless claim that the 16th chapter refers to a remote as opposed to remotest time, the language is clearly intended to mean an infinitely long time period, extending into the past and forward into the future. From here the attempt to then build the distinction between Nichiren as a true Buddha which is not supported by this gosho although it does try to make reference to a "provisional" manifestation of Bodhisattva Jogyo. The entire concept collapses like a house of cards. The passage in the NSIC version also reinforces the NONA version of "Sakyamuni Buddha, Lord of the Saha World and parent of all living beings" as opposed to the tortured NSIC translation of "the sage Nichiren is the sovereign of the threefold world, the father and mother of all people, and the emissary of Shakyamuni Buddha - Bodhisattva Jogyo." A claim at odds with the rest of the same Gosho as well as other Gosho and the Lotus Sutra."

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:00 am

Nichiren always, without a single exception, wrote Namu Myoho renge kyo, in every letter, in every thesis, and on every Gohonzon. SGI always writes Nam Myoho renge kyo in every letter and in every thesis. Nichiren Shoshu rarely writes Namu Myoho renge kyo. For this reason alone, the Nichiren Shu translations are superior.

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:05 am

The four ways to determine the accuracy of translations of the Lotus Sutra and writings of Nichiren

There are four ways to determine the accuracy of translations of the Lotus Sutra and writings of Nichiren: Learn Chinese and medieval Japanese, reading the Lotus Sutra and Nichiren's writings in the originals; have a trusted friend who reads Chinese and medieval Japanese critique the translations based on the originals; accurately ascertaining the pure faith and broad knowledge of the translator; and by becoming a votary of the Lotus Sutra and disciple and believer of Nichiren who studies everything ever written in one's native language. We are fortunate in that more has been written on Nichiren Lotus Sutra Buddhism in English than any language save for the Japanese.

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:11 am

Two translations of the same difficult passage from On Rebuking Slander of the Law and Eradicating Sins

"...We see from the sutra that only these four bodhisattvas had been the disciples of Shakyamuni, the lord of teachings, since numberless major world system dust particle kalpas in the past; from the time he had first aroused the aspiration for and attained enlightenment, they had never followed any other Buddha, nor had they required the instruction of the theoretical and essential teachings.

Thus T’ien-t’ai says, 'The great assembly witnessed the Bodhisattvas of the Earth alone making this pledge.' He also states, “[The Buddha said of the Bodhisattvas of the Earth,] ‘These are my disciples, destined to propagate my Law.’ Miao-lo says, 'The children propagate the Law of the father.' And Tao-hsien states, “The Law embodied therein [in the Lotus Sutra] is the Law that was realized countless kalpas in the past, and therefore it was entrusted to persons who had been the Buddha’s disciples from countless kalpas in the past.' Thus these five characters of Myoho-renge-kyo were entrusted to these four bodhisattvas." (WND)

“It appears that these Four Bodhisattvas are the people who are the disciples of the Master of Teachings Lord Shakya since kalpas as many as the worlds touched or not by the dust particles of five hundred of tens of trillions of nayutas of assamkheyas of great trichiliocosms (gohyaku jinden go) and who also, from their first arising of the Bodhi Mind, have not adhered to other Buddhas and who have not yet made an appearance in the Two Doctrines [of the Manifestations and the Original]. Tendai says, “He only sees the issuing of vows from the direction below [the Earth]”. He also says, “These are My disciples; they should spread My Dharma” and so on. Myoraku says, “The child spreads the father's Dharma." Tao‑hsien says, “Since the Dharma is the Dharma of the One Who Attained Long Ago, therefore He assigns it to the people of the One Who Attained Long Ago." It is the Five Characters Myo Ho Ren Ge Kyo that He yields to these Four People.” (STN, v. 1, 783‑784 -- Lamont)

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:15 am

More Gosho Zenshu

From Some Disputed Writings in the Nichiren Corpus
Dr. Stone
Ph.D. Dissertation
UCLA, 1990

"My own participation in the work for those volumes (The Major Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vols. 1 and 2) as one of the principal translators and editors, will account for any similarities between the English versions contained therein and the ones appearing here. The Major Writings was intended chiefly for Nichiren devotees as well as for an interested general readership. I have retranslated these seven pieces here in accordance with the rather different standards of academic Buddhist translation and my own preferences for wording. In some cases I have altered the interpretation of specific passages in ways I now feel more closely approximate the text. I have also worked from a different Japanese edition of Nichiren's collected writings (Showa teihon Nichiren Shonin ibun, 1989.)"

Her original translations of the Major Writings [MW] and the subsequent Writings of Nichiren Daishonin [WND] are derived from the Gosho Zenshu issued by the Nichiren Shoshu, admittedly Gosho not written in their original form. In addition, the translators [translations] were influenced and modified by feedback from non-Japanese speaking SGI-USA senior leaders and editors.

Article from Nichiren Shoshu Shinyo, September, 1995

"...This Gosho differs from the Gosho Zenshu and the Major Writings of Nichiren Daishonin in that the writings published in the Showa Shintei (New Edition) Gosho appear in the precise order in which they were initially written by the Daishonin and in their entire original form, that is all archaic Chinese characters and texts have been left intact, and no modifications have been made."

illarraza
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Re: The Writings of Nichiren

Post by illarraza » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:20 am

The thirty-six questions from The Selection of the Time one of Nichiren's Five Major Writings. Can you answer them?

“All of the wise persons of Japan at the present time are like the host of stars, and I, Nichiren, am like the full moon.” — The Selection of the Time

The Selection of The Time, one of Nichiren’s Five Major Writings, is a series of thirty-six questions and thirty answers. Can you answer the questions?

Question: If one preaches the great Law to people who do not have the capacity to understand it, then the foolish ones among them will surely slander it and will fall into the evil paths of existence. Is the person who does the preaching not to blame for this?

Question: Now these two views appear to be as incompatible as fire and water. May I ask how one is to resolve this dilemma? [The two views regarding the utilization of the gentle or forceful practices when spreading the Lotus Sutra]

Question: When is the time for the preaching of the Hinayana sutras and the provisional sutras, and when is the time for the preaching of the Lotus Sutra?

Answer: Even bodhisattvas, from those at the ten stages of faith to great bodhisattvas on the level of near perfect enlightenment, find it difficult to judge matters concerning time and capacity. How then can ordinary beings such as ourselves be able to judge such matters?

Question: Is there no way to determine them?

Answer: Let us borrow the eye of the Buddha to consider this question of time and capacity. Let us use the sun of the Buddha to illuminate the nation.

Question: What do you mean by that?

Question: What passages can you cite to prove this?

Question: The sutra passages you have cited clearly prove your point. But are there any prophecies in the writings of T’ien-t’ai, Miao-lo, or Dengyo that would support your argument?

Question: What you say is perfectly true. Nevertheless, we ordinary people have only a very remote idea of what the sutras mean, while the commentaries are more accessible and easier to understand. If there are clear passages of proof in such relatively understandable commentaries, then citing them might help us have greater faith in your argument.

Question: Do the scholars Nagarjuna and Vasubandhu say anything about this principle [of Namu-myoho-renge-kyo]?

Question: Why did they not expound it?

Question: Could you explain the matter in greater detail? [Why Nagarjuna and Vasubandu did not expound the Supreme Law].

Question: How then can you say that in the Middle Day of the Law the teachings of the Lotus Sutra were not widely disseminated and spread abroad?

Question: Do you mean to say that Nagarjuna, Vasubandhu, and the others did not teach the true meaning of the Lotus Sutra?

Question: Then what doctrines did they teach?

Question: How do you know that this is so? [repeated two times, that Nagarjuna and Vasubandu did not teach the doctrines of the Lotus Sutra].

Question: Among the treatises remaining in India, are there any that are superior to the ones transmitted to China? [Referring to any which might be superior the Lotus Sutra which was transmitted to China in the 3rd Century CE].

Question: Is there anyone else who thinks the way you do in this matter? [That the Three Truths doctrine is only correctly illucidated in the Lotus Sutra which goes way beyond the mere doctrine of Emptiness expounded in such Sutras as the Perfection of Wisdom and Flower Garland].

Question: In the latter part of the T’ang dynasty, the Tripitaka Master Pu-k’ung introduced to China a treatise in one volume entitled The Treatise on the Mind Aspiring for Enlightenment, whose authorship he ascribed to Bodhisattva Nagarjuna. The Great Teacher Kobo says of it, “This treatise represents the heart and core of all the thousand treatises of Nagarjuna.” What is your opinion on this?

Question: How do you know that the translators other than Kumarajiva made errors?

Question: That tells us about the translators who lived at the time of Kumarajiva or before. But what about later translators such as Shan-wu-wei or Pu-k’ung? [This question pertains to the false and error filled translations and misguided translators in the Middle Day but please keep in mind that today, in this Latter Day, the problem of false and erroneous translations from the misguided Nichiren Shoshu and Soka Gakkai translators are an even more grievous matter].

Question: In view of all this, how can you deny that during the Middle Day of the Law the true meaning of the Lotus Sutra was not made clear,..?

Question: How then can you deny that in the latter part of the Middle Day of the Law the wide proclamation and propagation of the Lotus Sutra was not achieved?

Question: What is this secret Law? First, tell me its name, and then I want to hear its meaning.

Question: In what way are these three schools in error? [Pure Land, True Word, and Zen]

Question: What are we to make of such statements put forth in these commentaries? [That the True Word teachings Are Superior to the Lotus Sutra teachings].

Question: When it comes to those who maintain that the Lotus Sutra is superior to the True Word teachings, should they try to make use of these commentaries by Jikaku, or should they reject them?

Question: How do we come to understand it? [The Tendai priest Jikaku's errors].

Question: The great earthquake of the Shoka era, the huge comet of the Bun’ei era— what caused these to appear?

T’ien-t’ai says, “Wise men can perceive the cause of things, as snakes know the way of snakes.”

Question: What do you mean by this statement?

Question: Is there anyone in Japan, China, or India who understands this matter? [That bodhisattva Superior Practices Has been summoned by Shakyamuni Buddha to spread Namu Myoho renge kyo in this dreadful age]?

Question: But if there is no wise person who understands why these calamities have arisen, then how can proper steps be taken to deal with them?

Question: Now the great earthquake and the huge comet that have appeared are calamities brought about by heaven, which is enraged because the ruler of our country hates Nichiren and sides with the Zen, Nembutsu, and True Word priests who preach doctrines that will destroy the nation!

How can I believe that?

Question: At the time of your second pronouncement on the twelfth day of the ninth month in the eighth year of the Bun’ei era, when you incurred the wrath of the authorities, how did you know that if harm was done to you rebellion would break out and the country would also be attacked by armies from abroad?

Question: These men were all guilty of faults that condemned them to the Avichi hell or the hell of incessant suffering. How, then, do you dare to claim that you are the wisest man in the entire land of Jambudvipa? Will you not fall into hell like the others? What a frightful thing to do!

Question: Is there anyone from times past who has spoken the way you have just done? [Nichiren Daishonin's proclaiming himself the Supreme Votary of the Sutra].

Question: “But under what circumstances should one be prepared to sacrifice one’s life and safety?”

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